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It will never end? Good!

Love reading the new HOF speeches and the daily posts, etc.   I will never stop reading this stuff and I will always stay plugged into the information I can learn from.   I'm heading into the stretch of time that I've feared since I first quit back in June. That time that I think I am in control and that I can have that one dip or that one pull on a cigarette or cigar. I know its a lie. I'm addicted to nicotine and it can't play another role in my life other than a past role. Everytime I think that I would be OK, I read some tidbit about quitting, and then I remember I can do this for just one day. Nothing is so important that I can give in.   I will never stop learning from this site and will always quit one day at a time. And that's GOOD!   Thanks everyone here. NDT!

maquit

maquit

 

13 Miles between me and the NB

I am truly blessed. I guess! There are thirteen miles between the NB and me. She lives at the Shell Station exactly thirteen mile from my house. Last night, as she called to me I walk toward her not only once by twice. The First time she called me, to walk toward her for six miles. I managed to turn my back on her and walk back home fighting the urge. The second time at 3 am she called once more. Woke me up out of what little sleep I was able to get last night. I was pissed!! When I willing wanted her in my life she never called to me like this!! Now I want her out of my life and she calls and calls like a lost calf. Thank you 13 miles!!! for staying between the NB and me.

geffdiv

geffdiv

 

HANG ON FOR THE RIDE OF MY LIFE

I am 28 years old. I have chewed/dipped snuff since 2004. when i started i only use about one can every few days.. that is because i was hiding it from my parents. When i graduated high school, my mom asked me how long i had beed dipping? Guess moms have ways of finding that stuff out.   Started college in fall of 2004 then i started going threw a can every other day. Before i got married in 2008 i started going threw a can a day. Then as stress with dead end job built up. the snuff was the only thing that kept me sane. Changed jobs.. got a job that required house driving around the oil patch.. That is when 1 to-1 1/2 cans came in to play.   Guess the fact was i enjoyed to dip.. Now i don't enjoy it. It is impossible for me to quit "cold turkey". i have tried this several times. i turn in to the grinch, oscar the grouch.   Now it is 2 cans + a day! there seems to be a pattern here that i don't care for. i have got to stop this habit!!   LET THE RIDE BEGIN!!!!!!!!!       Preferences     § 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 - = Backspace   Tab q w e r t y u i o p [ ]     Return     capslock a s d f g h j k l ; ' \   shift ` z x c v b n m , . / shift       English         Deutsch     Español     Français     Italiano     Português     Русский   alt alt         Preferences       Preferences     § 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 - = Backspace   Tab q w e r t y u i o p [ ]     Return     capslock a s d f g h j k l ; ' \   shift ` z x c v b n m , . / shift       English         Deutsch     Español     Français     Italiano     Português     Русский   alt alt         Preferences  

spazmechanic

spazmechanic

 

Day 7 - Back to routine

Well I've made it to day 7. The weekend was the most challenging, My monday - friday is pretty much all routine. Wake, Walk Dog, Return, Shower, Work, YMCA, Work, Home, Run, Dinner, Repeat. I figured out fairly quickly how to do that routine without chewing. Now Sat & Sun is when it got the most challenging. Working on stuff in the garage, watching football, yard work all those were challenging. made it thru it though and here we are on a Monday again. Back to routine of work week & ready to add more & more days to my quit.  

jgregg

jgregg

 

Day 3 - No dip

Well here we are on the morning of day 3 and i have to say it hasn't been as horrible as i had imagined. Wake up each morning and instantly grab a nicorette. shower get on with my day. Drinking a lot more coffee than i use to. i also gave up drinking pop & beer on the same day i quit the dip with hopes that if i have to cave i can cave on pop 1st then alcohol. gives me something to cave on without hurting my big goal (to quit chewing for good) no headaches or horrible cravings yet (is my body still just in shock?) lol. off to get another cup of coffee.

jgregg

jgregg

 

My story

A little introduction to get to know my story. I'm 31 years old. I started chewing in college & have been a heavy user since. I use about a can of grizzly wintergreen each day and 1/2 a can of Camel Snus. I have a wife & 3 wonderful kids. I have been wanting to quit for a while and set my quit day as October 1st. (today). Last night I wasn't sure how i would get thru the morning not having one in the shower and then on the way to work. I got up wanted one but didn't then on the way to work again wanted it but didn't. (feeling a little accomplished right now) I know it's only been a few hours but i am ready to kick this! Picked up some seeds & some packs of gum on my way to work. I'm not sure if people read these but i'm going to keep updating in hopes that it will help someone quit or maybe i can find someone to quit with me.

jgregg

jgregg

 

Gonna Quit

I have been chewing a can a day for 13 years and have "quit" multiple times. Just found this site and have set a quit date for 09-04-13. Need all the help I can get. Thanks!

targhee_hunter

targhee_hunter

 

Good Day

I just realized that in the last 90-days, I haven't once thought "I need to quit chewing tobacco". Before this, I would say "I need to quit this shit" at least once a week. More so if my gums were sore, or I got that effin white wrinkly patch on my lip.   Today I am free of it, and today was good. One day at a time, and I'm looking forward to more days like this. I know I see alot of posts about craves for the rest of our lives, and you've got to stay committed to quitting forever. We did this to ourselves, and this is the price we must pay. But if there is more of this out there, I'm all in! I want everyone to feel this good and even better. This site will help us all get a taste! I'm hooked!

maquit

maquit

 

i need help

Hello.   I found this place today, hoping i can find my peace with quitting.   I first had skoal in grade 10..Didn't feel sick or dizzy, i loved it. i did it once in a blue moon all through high school and than i joined the army where everyone Dips....dips a lot.   It is everywhere i look, i was doing a tin a day, no problem, and it canada its 20 bucks a tin, so you can do the math and see how incredible stupid it was to continue to do this, but i couldn't help it. I got myself into this incredible routine. Wake up, do PT and rush home to have a shower, eat, coffee than.... Put a good Dip in. got to work. wait an hour or so...Dip in. dip in. dip in. all day long. My favourite time, was Driving, i could crush a tin on a five hour drive, and never feel better. i was a dip monster, and in the army, it is everywhere , all my friends and peers were doing it, we would talk Dip, share Dip, switch Dip. it was our life. One by one my brothers with quitting successfully... and than there was me. I hoped on the quitting train, Untill day three, than i would cave, buy i tin, feel like shit, go another three days. This has been going on for months now. My friends words of wisdom is, Quit you pussy. I need help. i need a mentor. i am new to this site, i dont know how it works, and Forgive my grammar and sentence and paragraph structure, i blow stuff up for a living, not write novels. so if anyone can help me with this devil, greatly appreciated .     cheers!

GnrGillman

GnrGillman

 

Tim in a can

It is funny now that I look back and think how munch time I wasted thinking and buying cans of dip. Oh and the cash wow the money i spent on dip. I look at it like time lost money lost that i will never get back. the sad thing is i am 28 days in my quite and still think about it wounder about what it would be like to have a reel dip. would i get that same buz i got 17 years ago. What would it be like to have a dip in my lip. I know it is bad to have these thoughts but they are in my head. Every Time I see a can of dip or have to get gas these thoughts pop in my head. I know That my will power is what keeps me from caving in that I have people on this site going thru the same crap I am and my wife is helping any way she can . Every day I am tobacco free is a good day and a win save the day.   I am now showing some singes of slight depression and being a little sad And I some times I just Have a little rage I think this is all apart of the quite Thing Thank good I have a wife that is very under standing I know I would not even think about quiting at the end of the day I still have 28 days Tobacco free and that is what I need to think about and making it to 29 and the rest of my life

joe 76

joe 76

 

That New-Quit Smell

During my quit research (quitsearch?), I repeatedly come across the concept of the icky 3s, and the 3rd of the icky 3s is that somewhere around the three-month mark (obviously different depending on the person), people often experience a plateau in their quit a case of the blahs, depression, anti-climatic realizations, boredom, or whatever. The novelty of quitting is probably wearing off, and were becoming comfortable with our new, dip-free, lives. Weve battled the physical challenge, weve faced the psychological withdrawals, and we are left wondering Now What? That is where Im most concerned with the comfort of quitting.   Im a veteran quitter (On my 6th earnest attempt), but it is new every time. Different job, different house, different state, different time, different me, and so on. Im getting pretty good at quitting, just not at staying quit. Similarities certainly exist with each quit, (cravings, urges, rage, anxiety, depression), but the uniqueness is still there to pique our interest. But like the new car smell, the novelty of quitting eventually fades, and normalcy sets in. We dont chew in our new life, and that is the new normal. Even though I might accept being an ex-dipper, I (we?) am nowhere close to fully understanding the vast expanse of my nicotine addiction, and at least for me, how to finally end my 32 years love/hate relationship with this toxic substance. Im still thinking about dipping, and most of us are still feeling the urge to dip periodically. We are getting good, perhaps even comfortable, at handling craves, diffusing caves, and managing emotions. I know I still feel edgy from time-to-time, and put a golf club in my hand, I can full on erupt into a certifiable raging lunatic. Its only natural for most of us to wonder if it will always be like this. For me, this is where the One Day at a Time plays the most important role in my quit, and the only part of this quit I am comfortable with. With this addiction, there is no always. There is only today, and perhaps more appropriately, there is only this moment in time, the tic of the second-hand, the blink of an eye. Get through the day, face each challenge in the moment, and dont worry about tomorrow. It will come, as sure as the sun will set each night, and rise the next morning. Even though the New-Quit smell may fade, my quit remains reliable and will still get me there One Day At A Time.

maquit

maquit

 

13 days in to my quit will the cravings every stop

Today has been craving hell all day it started with a text from my mother who has allwas favored my brother who smokes 2 packs a day and then a call from my sister who smokes too packs a day. One would think thre famly would support me but not mine ther is a reson I live 900 miles away from them. At lest I have my wife I know this quiting has not been easy on hear. but un like my mother and sister she has my back and want me to be hear 30 years from now. today has been craving hell. I keep thinking I have cash the gasstation is less then a block like I can see it out the window why not go get a can I made it 13 days that is good If my own mother and sister wont back me then a nice chew would be grate today. It is funny 17 years of dipping and now 13 day with out. Every time life got hard I had a chew every time something good happend I had a chew ever time I woke up or after I ate the drive to work at work and now what. it is crazy 13 days and I still have craving that are so strong.   The thing is I have never been ashamed of chew i am a big bIg man i have been a boncer. One time I was in a bar and this man was campling about me and my friends spiting in a cup I pick him up chair and all smiled and ask do we have a problem. The thing is i have quit for my wife and the kids we would like to have some day. If I can make it bed time to my bed with my wife and sleep may be tommorrw will be easer i hope. one day at a time

joe 76

joe 76

 

An Interesting Thing Happened on the Way to the Bowling Alley

So Saturday night, I’m off to bowl with my brother. I had fought some awful cravings all day will doing yardwork (one of my 3 triggers) and was admittedly “jonesing” for a crutch. I asked him to stop at 7-11 to see if they had any dip substitute. Of course they didn’t (they never do here in Vancouver). I was a little cautious, but I felt I was in control of the situation, but I really wanted to take a little of the edge off that had built up over the last 32 years. Seeds had helped during the day, as well as copious quantities of water. I just wanted to pursue some Smoky Mountain or Bacc Off, or some other substitute. I was on a mission, driven by a subliminal machine that wouldn't seem to stop. There was a tobacco shop across the street from the alley and told my brother I would be right back. While he got us a lane, etc, I visited the shop and, sure enough, they had Smoky Mountain wintergreen (tastes just like Hawken). I happily paid the $3.24 for the can and proceeded to open the can and pop a faux-chew in. The same old mechanics from 64 days ago came back so easily and I proceed to just go through the physical steps of having a dip without the nicotine. Having not used nicotine-free dip as a substitute during this quit, I was worried it might trigger some other automatic, habitual response, like going for a real can. The opposite may have occurred, because the last 36-hours, I’ve been better than any time during my quit. No cravings, no urges, no rage, not anything. I don’t even know whereabouts of the smoky mountain can. I’m typing this at work (another trigger) and am only thinking of this now because I haven’t posted a blog entry in awhile. I’m not advocating the use of this substitute, but in a moment potential weakness, it seemed to do the trick for me.   On a personal level, it feels sort of like a relapse, in the habitual sense, and I hope it doesn’t lead to a real one.   I’ll keep you posted.

maquit

maquit

 

every day is a fight and ever night is a win

I have made it 9 day's with out chew. That is the longest time I have gone with out dip this century. It is funny to think that since the year 2000 I have never gone 9 days with out dip. And the only reason I would have gone one day with out was if I was broke and was unable to buy a can. I look back at my life and think how much power that can had and still has over me. I would never be with out at lest one can at all times. I rember going on vaction and buying 12 cans for 6 days just so I know I would not run out. I would stop by the gas sation and buy a can even if I had a can. Now 9 days in to quitting I still look for my can. I feel for it in my pocket or on the seat of the suv that is how much power that little can has had over me. NO more today I look for something else to look for and think about.   The past nine days have been tough every day a fight every night a wine. I thnk about having a chew first thing when I wake up and last thing when I go to bed. Last night I went all night with out thinking about it with out looking for my can or with out being pissed. It was a win and the first time i was able to see a life with out chew a life with out the can. I was just out with the fathernlaw working on the car and hanging out in the back yard and for the first time this century I was out side with no dip and was not evan thinking about it a win in my book. Every wine is one step closer to being something I have not been this century a non tabacco user. Thanks for reading and good luck quitters

joe 76

joe 76

 

It has been a long week

I quit chewing a week ago today. I had no idea how tough it was going to be. I started chewing 17 years ago when I was 19 and a construction worker. Back then every one I worked with smoked or chew it was just a thing ever dude I worked with had a can. you were able to get a dip off someones can at any time. Mint was what I liked and would buy for the next 17 years. I just got married back in may and it was my wife who keep on me to quite. She started trying to help with the quite prosses evan befor we got marryed. She bought me coffie chew she saw on the show shark tank. It did not help. In the end I just went for it and quite cold tarky. man has it been tough. But what I am finding out is my coworkers and friends and my wife are supporting me through this. The cravings are the big thing now. Driving in the car, Sitting at the desk. Oh and today was the worst craving I have had. A man came in walk up to my desk and I know he was a chewer when i saw him. He pulled out his can and it took every thing i had not to ask for a dip. I am still thinking about it hours later and had to write about it. To get through he left and I am still a week chew free a big win for me. I know i have not been a nice guy this week and my wife and cowerkers have had to put up with my mood swings and me just being pissed. I hope in the end this is all just a bad week. The funny thing about me trying to quit is the people who are still chewing and smoking giving me advice on how to quit i mean how would you know and why the hell would I listen to you. Thanks for reading I am taking it day by and week by week good luck to all you quiters

joe 76

joe 76

 

Shame on Me.

This revalation stung me to the core.   I love the commentary on this site that refers to the efforts chewers will go to hide their habit. Just a few expamples - I love the hiding of the spit bottle under the seat, taking the long way home to savor the dip a little longer, making excuses to run an errand so you could skulk about with your nasty habit, lurking in unsavory locales to indulge our unsavory habit. My personal favorite for myself was standing by the front window, waiting for the wife to come home. As soon as she came over the rise, I’d spring into action. Sprint to the bathroom, fling my dip into the waiting toilet, begin brushing teeth with pre-loaded toothbrush, flush toilet, rinse mouth, and pop in a fresh piece of gum and hop back on the couch, all in the time it would take her to drive up, open garage door, park, and get into the house. Awfully elaborate scheme (one of many) just to sneak a dip. It is almost like we having an affair with Chew. Shameful.   I think it is why I loved dipping when I was playing golf (wife doesn’t golf so it gave me 5 -6 hours of uninterrupted dip time, including drive time), or yard work (not my wife’s cup of tea), or at the office. At work I’d take a smaller pinch and spread it out across my gum so no one would see the walnut-sized dead give-away on display in my lower lip. I’ve since come to find out that, while barely perceptible to me, the “chew breath” was very noticeable to others. Shame on me for being deceptive to hide this habit.   I remember once, that I “hid” my can in my driver door map compartment of my truck. My wife doesn’t drive my truck so I wasn’t too worried about being busted, but I covered it with a napkin, just in case. Well, I was out walking the dog that morning, and my wife thought it would be nice to start my truck so it would warm for my drive into work. When she opened the door, the napkin blew out, surely exposing the shame of my dip can to her. At the moment, I was so inwardly upset that she went into the truck. WHY? Because she invaded my privacy and busted me. God I’m a JERK! What started as such a nice gesture became a source of irritation, because my bluff was called, my deception revealed, I was caught in a lie. While she never said anything about the can, and we never discussed it, I feel ashamed to this day about how I felt. As a contingency plan, I did buy a green tin of breath mints to put in the truck door, so that if it did come up, I could say she might have thought it was Kodiak, but it was just mints. God, what a turd I am. Shame on Me!   I should’ve owned my addiction, and put that gross shit on display. Maybe it would have shamed me into quitting earlier. Perhaps a nag here, a disgusting look there, or even a lecture on the hazards might have prompted me earlier. I won’t dwell on the past, but only look to the future of a dip-free life. I plan for the future but must act for today. 53 days in, the craves don’t come like they did during the first part of June. I know they’ll come, and I’ve planned for them. Just as I know the sun will set tonight, and rise again tomorrow, I will be here, quitting, with all these fine folks. Shame is not necessarily a bad thing either. The shame of facing you all in the event of a relapse is a powerful deterrent.

maquit

maquit

 

Perspective This!

As Ive said before, I think one of my toughest challenges the future me is going to face has to do with my perspective of chewing. I will need to find a way to reprogram my brain and change my past, and flawed, perspective on popping a chew. This quit, this journey, this construction of my monument, must represent a basic shift in thinking. I believe I must see quitting chewing, not as a shame on you, you should know better exercise, but as an opportunity for growth as a person who now makes better choices for a healthy lifestyle and repulses the immediate and temporary gratification of chewing tobacco. This is a crucial step, that Im not quite ready to take just yet, but one that I will prepare for in the process of One Day At A Time. It is this shift in perspective that will prepare me for that potentially inevitable Just one chew wont hurt moment that is my biggest fear. I will also never forget my accountability to myself and this group. I wont let either of them down.

maquit

maquit

 

No End In Sight

You know how people say "you can see the light at the end of the tunnel" indicating the end of a long struggle or tough project? I look at this entire quit process as seeing the light at the start of the challenge. Nicotine addiction has blocked the light for too long. More along the lines of "I see the light" or an epiphany. The light is so bright. The big difference being that there is no end to this process. I accept my role in this addiction. I'm a quitter. I will stay on this path to achieve the ultimate goal of a lifetime of quitting. I know there is no end in sight, and I don't care. One day at a time, until my days run out.

maquit

maquit

 

Tough Trigs

This was certainly a "one day at a time" moment in my quit. I knew I was facing a tough day. I love to golf, and it is one of the things I used to chew while doing. A nearly perfect opportunity - outdoors, active, hanging with the guys, drinking a few brews. While I played like a no talent ass-clown, and wished for something to make me play better, I chose NDT instead of a better golf score. More because I know dip doesn't make anything better. I must acknowledge the impact that dip has made on my life. I must engage in an emotional battle in areas where emotion is an adversary, and not an ally. Just venting a few thoughts and channeling some regret. I do love to tee it up, I do hate to play poorly because of emotional inconsistency, and I alone must find a way to balance the scale, which I will. I hate what dip has made me, and I hate that I have triggers. I love quitting tobacco, and I love every day of my "one day at a time". Tomorrow will be better.

maquit

maquit

 

F U Relaps

People often quit chewing and then somehow find themselves chewing again. We’ve all probably done it. For some, this occurs in the first few gut-wrenching days, the first challenging weeks, or a few months after quitting, usually when the “Blahs” kick in. This won’t happen to me, again. What I’m focused on is 6-months and beyond, and what I plan to do about it today. In the past, I’ve always relapsed by just having “one dip” to maybe recall the nostalgia days, say during a round of golf, a softball, game, or a long road trip. Without fail, this relapse has always meant a return to chewing, and a complete return to business as usual before I quit.   I know most people who quit chewing relapse at some time. I’ve relapsed, somewhere around 5-times. My embarrassment might be keeping me from recalling others, but I’m sure of at least 5. I’ve done my relapsing, and I’ve heard that the more you try to quit, the greater my chances of actually quitting. This is my time, I want this, I need this, it is mine, and mine alone, and nothing will deter me from this goal of nicotine freedom. Success will be mine. I’m done relapsing. I quit yesterday. I promise to quit today, and I will quit tomorrow. One Day At A Time, I will beat the effin relapse.   Today, I admit I’m beating myself up over past relapses. Why didn’t I stay quit? Why am I reliving the torture, anguish, rage, and frustrations of every previous quit, even though I’ve done it at least 5-times before. While I’m not putting my current frame of mind in a negative light, I’m trying to reinforce and reprogram my mind to think differently than I have in the past, to stop this cycle of quit-relapse-quit once and for all. I’m disappointed with my past self, but believe my future self will have greater success. My past experience encourages me to do better. I am optimistic I can stay quit. I believe a positive approach will help me reach my goal of tobacco freedom.   I know why I’m quitting this time. I’m too old for this shit and I finally believe it is bad for me. I know that might sound strange to some, but for the longest time (32 years at least) I believed I was invincible to the dangers. But today, while I feel pretty god damn bulletproof, I’ve now come to terms with the negativity effects of chewing and no longer want to participate in its dance of death. I’m sitting that dance out the rest of my life   I’m not trying to be too analytical of my situation, I’m just planning for the day, someday in the future, that I’ll be faced with this urge, this crave, this programming error, that will test me. Today, I quit “One Day At A Time”, and today I planned to prevent a relapse.

maquit

maquit

 

Missed Opportunity?

Spent three hours with a buddy I hadn't seen in 6-years, sitting across from him, discussing conference room remodel options and concept design development. In a room full of folks, he had his spit cup and big ol dipper of blue skoal (is that spearmint?)in there. Did I want a dip, nah, I'm full of piss and vinegar for my quit, and this journey is just starting. But I seriously thought about offering up a sort of "testimonial" about my experience over the last 40-days. The overwhelming sense of relief that I've tried again to break this bond with chew, the concept of accountability, the broad range of emotions I've witnessed, just to quit "One Day At A Time".   I chose not to. Maybe I didn't want to seem preachy. Maybe I remember the times others had tried to push me to quit before, and the resentment and "How Dare You" attitude I took. Quitting this habit, confronting this addiction, building this "monument" is such a deeply personal choice, rife with unique and intimate characteristics, that no one except the quitter can truly understand. I can share my experiences, but they don't resonate perfectly with another quitter. Although spitting out the window at 65 MPH resonates with most.   Perhaps it was a missed opportunity, but I'll sleep OK tonight. I want everyone that wants to quit to be successful. I want to share in their success, and support them when they need it, but I'm not sure I want to preach to those without ears.   Maybe I was wrong, time may tell.   On a side note, it took me an hour and 20 minutes to drive 2 miles in effed up traffic. Took my stress out on half a bag of David's sunflowers seeds. I may be addicted to nicotine, but with you all as my witness, I am no longer a chewer, and I remain accountable to myself and all of you. NDT - Proper

maquit

maquit

 

My Monument

What’s it take to build my monument? Simple – “One Day At A Time” Past success, that’s just what it is – In the past, and the layers of my monument. I did it, but I must do it again today “One Day At A Time” . I can’t celebrate tomorrow, it hasn’t happened yet, and that are layers yet to be built. Today matters. Today is my “One Day” and the time is now, and that is the part of my monument that I will focus on.   I’m also part of another community, focused on quitting smoking. I joined there, as part of a plan to use technology to help me quit. Apps weren’t mainstream when I tried to quit last time. Blogs were a novelty, and on no one’s radar. Social networking was something you did at happy hour or the nineteenth hole. Enough of the generation gap, I’m older, I know it. My point I’m laboring to get to has to do with the uptick in solid quitters struggling through the 1 – 3 month period. Most non-chewers/smokers thing they’ve eclipsed the physical hurdles of addiction and get blind-sided by these deep-seeded primitive urges that creep up from the psyche. These are the urges I’m here to find a way to overcome, to complete my monument.   I’ve quit many times, with what many would consider success. I started this quit with a call to a 1-800 number and explained my history and past quits. He was taken aback by the fact that I started chewing again after quits of 6 months and a year and a half. If he only knew. My guess is they are not prepared to fix the kind of broken I am. I now look at all previous quits as “practice” quits, more like pauses at the side of the path to oblivion. I wasn't ready to build my monument.   This quit will not be a failure, I’m in the show now, and I’m accountable. I’m planning to succeed, with a simple personal goal. One echoed throughout this site, and sits upon the home page “One Day At A Time”. I plan to fix what is broken, and I’m doing that now. With each day, the maquit’s repair and education continues. Each day my monument grows.   Urges will come and go. Some will be stronger than others. I have a plan to address urges that starts with posting Roll-Call daily, gum or seeds. Should that fail, I plan to introduce exercise or some other physical exertion that refocus the peanut part of my brain that is clogging the clear and quit-minded part of my brain. If that fails, I will call on you, the successful quitters that I am now accountable to. I’ve got one available on demand, and plan to get more. In due time, I’ll make myself available to those who need a hand. Perhaps others will come to see value in my monument.   As I blather on, it comes down to the simple concept of “One Day At A Time”. That is the strong and stable foundation I will build the monument to my quit. A shining example to no one else but me, exemplifying my personal commitment to breaking this long and self-destructive pattern of smokeless tobacco use, and confirmation of the value of accountability that helps make this quit different and permanent.   I really need to take this concept to the golf course. I’d be a better putter.

maquit

maquit

 

Good Riddance

Dip, you are not my friend. I came to rely on you for what I believed to be stimulation, relaxation, or stress relief. I became physically and psychologically addicted to you and the more I used you, the more difficult it has become to leave you. As I became more physically addicted to you, I developed other habits that made you even more important to me.   It was so gradual; I did not even realize it was happening. A round of golf, or other outdoor sports activities, always triggered a move toward a dip. I would jump in the car for a road trip, and I’d pop a chew, thinking you’d help me along the way. A little yard work, like mowing the lawn, pruning a tree, weeding, or anything else outdoors, the urge to dip was there. It soon became a trained response, to want to have a chew, and it became even more so, when I wanted to dip at work, or on the couch watching TV, or damn near anywhere else. When I wanted to let go, you wouldn’t let me. Maybe it was me that was too weak to say goodbye to my nearly constant companion of 32 years. All that being said, you nearly ruined me.   Ours has always been a toxic bond, a one-way street that led only to my demise. Well, I’m no longer going to be part of this poisoned venture. From this day forward, I will find a way to repel you. No longer will I think that it is OK to chew. I will fight to take control. I will fight each day, until each day becomes a week, and weeks to months to years to decades and beyond. This is over. We are through. Don’t call, don’t tap my shoulder, get out of my head. The road we’ve travelled together has come to an end.   And don’t go looking for any of my friends either. I’ll be there for them and they are there for me too. Together we will drive you from our lives.   Goodbye Forever Dip!   Mike

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