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Ohioman1972

Quit smoking

102 posts in this topic

My name is Bill. I chose the username Old BoBo after the BoBo doll of the 1960's because it can get hit but it bounces right back.

 

I dipped Copenhagen since the ripe old age of 19 when I joined the Marine Corps. Before that it was Skoal, and Skoal Longcut Mint from the time I was 12. I'm 45: do the math.

 

I tried quitting once before in 1993 while I was stationed in Oki. Lasted about 3 days and I quit quitting.

 

I've finally had enough. I only coincidentally stopped dipping on 12/31. It was not part of a New Years resolution

 

Glad to have found this place. I live in SC and currently attend school full time after retiring from active duty.

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My name is Bill. I chose the username Old BoBo after the BoBo doll of the 1960's because it can get hit but it bounces right back.

 

I dipped Copenhagen since the ripe old age of 19 when I joined the Marine Corps. Before that it was Skoal, and Skoal Longcut Mint from the time I was 12. I'm 45: do the math.

 

I tried quitting once before in 1993 while I was stationed in Oki. Lasted about 3 days and I quit quitting.

 

I've finally had enough. I only coincidentally stopped dipping on 12/31. It was not part of a New Years resolution

 

Glad to have found this place. I live in SC and currently attend school full time after retiring from active duty.

Great to have you on the quit train, Bill! I, like you, started using tobacco at a very young age. This site was a God send to me. I hope you will take advantage of all the resources that are available here. There is a bunch of reading material that will help answer a lot of your general questions. At the same time, don't be timid. Ask as many questions as you feel the need to. There are a bunch of great quitters on this site...proof that it can be done. So, welcome! See you in roll call!

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Bill -

 

Like you, I started dipping at the age of 13-14 years old circa1979. It started out with Hawkens and Kodiac while playing stickball in the neighborhood. It quickly progressed to Shoal, and then Copenhagen, and flowed through into all other areas of my life. My parents were smokers who regarded dip as an unpleasant but tolerable compromise, as long as I did not leave "spit cups" around. That stopped being a concern probably around sophomore year of high school, as I learned to swallow the spit.

 

I chewed tobacco, every day and all of the time ... through exams and graduations, through the birth of my three children, during job interviews and jury trials (I am an attorney), on the way to work/at work/after work. I did not chew on the day that I buried my father, who died of tobacco-related cancer. But I chewed the next day. So I think it is pretty safe to say that I have a full understanding of our tobacco addiction, what it means to us, and how its tentacles extend to every facet of your life. I am late 40's, so just a touch older than you.

 

There is, however, one important difference between you and I ... I stumbled upon this website in November of 2001, nearly 15 years ago, and on November 3, 2001, I quit using tobacco. Other than marrying my wife of 25 years, and being a father to my children, it is the best, most important, and perhaps most impressive accomplishment of my life. I regard the success that I had in the battle with tobacco addiction as the "blue print" for achieving success and making positive changes in all areas of my life ... It has lead me to open and run my own business, to compete in long distance triathlons, to coach select sports teams, to run marathons, and at times, be the best person that I can be.

 

I still stop by this website every now and again, not because I have anything left to say about tobacco addiction (already written too much) or because I have any thoughts or concerns about tobacco addiction (never think about it ... cannot even comprehend why I engaged in this pathetic, moronic, masochistic habit in the first place). Rather, I stop by in the hope of coming across someone like you, to give back to this community. I want you to know that you absolutely can quit chewing tobacco, because I was you. I want you to know that this place is THE resource that you need to succeed ... and you should combine your involvement here with anything else you may need to succeed in this battle (lots of good advice here). And I want you to know that this commitment, this achievement, will be one of the most meaningful, important, and long-lasting accomplishments in your life. That is a big claim, but it is not an overstatement. This process teaches or reminds you that you possess the power of self-determination. It proves that you can do anything that you want with a strong commitment, the right tools and resources, and the support of friends and family. You can, and will, free your mind of addiction with a day-by-day, moment-to-moment commitment to not use tobacco. Invest your time and energy here, and it comes back to you 10 fold.

 

So congratulations, Bill, on your discovery and your decision. Good luck.

 

Bluesman

Edited by Bluesman
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Bluesman delivers again. Nicely said, sir!

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Now I know there is a special force in the universe. I'm logged for the first time in a couple of years because I noticed on my calendar that today is my (2003) Hall of Fame day. What do I see, but a post from Bluesman!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! His posts are what convinced me to QS in late 2002, and sustained me to hit the HOF in Jan 2003. He was, is and shall remain my hero.

 

I've written many posts in my years, but cannot say anything better than he has already. And his last post is a perfect summary of my chains (24 hr closet dipping attorney) and my pride in my achievement in quitting. My life is in a fantastic place now, which never would have been the case if I hadn't quit.

 

Back in 2002/2003, I never could have imagined 12-13 years of freedom. Well I'm testifying now that it is all there for the taking.

 

One last thing, I did have a few months' lapse during a 2010 divorce. Stupid, stupid, and no excuse, but there you have it. That is why I have posted both under my original name of SpongeBob, and my 2nd name of Round2. (During that 2nd quit, I logged in regularly for support but did not post until I had reached the HOF my second time.) My point? You are always a short drive and a few buck away from a full blown cave. There is NO "just 1 cuz today sucks." But if you do fall, get back up as soon as possible.

 

Funny, I have no desire to chew again, but I do still have occasional nightmares in which I have a big fatty in my mouth, and angry & sad over caving, and terrified of being caught. I think those dreams are a good vigilance against letting myself fall again.

 

Stay strong all you quitters. God Bless Us, Every One!!!!!

(And may all tobacco executives be first up against the wall when the revolution comes. I spit on them, but it's clear and not brown.)

 

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The past couple of weeks I have been thinking about my life a year ago. I was in a dark place that I never imagined I would be. I was depressed and sick....hurt and angry. I was addicted to a drug that I couldn't shake no matter what I did. I knew it was time to quit.....my body had given me more signs to give it up than I care to mention. And yet here I was......Still not able to quit with any true intention that it would last more than a few days.

 

Then exactly one year ago today (1-21-15) I stumbled across this website while looking for withdrawal symptoms from tobacco. At first I wasn't sure exactly what I had found. I read a few things from the front page.....the SpongeBob Mantra....Bluesman's writings, etc. Then I decided to join the site so I could see what else these quitters had to say. With the stroke of a few letters on the keypad my life was about to change in a way I could never imagine. I chatted with my now good friend Fish.....he was a couple of months quit after relapsing from a 5 year quit. What? 5 years quit....that just sounded like a foreign language to me. I met some others great guys and then finally I set the date and QUIT!

 

I won't go into detail what happened from there....you can go to May 2015 and read my story...my Hof, etc. It has been an incredible journey......and then this morning....after posting roll (yes I still post every day) I stumbled across this great post (2016 café) from SpongeBob .........Yes....that SpongeBob....the one that came up with the SpongeBob Mantra I have lived by for the past year. And just a few days before him it was Bluesman throwing some great words at us.

 

What got me from SpongeBob was his talk of his relapse in 2010. He relapsed for 6 months after a 7 year quit. At first I felt sad this had happened but then I read his home page and realized he had something even more important I needed to hear.

 

I think all of us come to this site with a certain degree of self loathing (some more than others).....I know I did. We feel we aren't as "good" as others because we can't cope with life's problems without tobacco. When it comes down to it we start to truly hate ourselves for our destructive behavior. Then I read SpongeBob's page this morning.......what stuck out wasn't his famous mantra....not his relapse and then success again in 2010. It was the words that we need to forgive ourselves. We need to stop beating ourselves up for this crazy habit we clung to for so long.....We are HUMAN! Wow......It just hit me like ton of bricks.

 

I am almost one year quit.....yet I still feel that tug on occasion. I am one year quit yet I can't say for sure this is it. I am one year quit yet I can only promise what I will do today. I am one year quit and I forgive myself for the things I did in the past to hurt my mind and body. I am one year quit and ready to live for today.....and tomorrow.......not in the past.

 

I don't want this to sound like I am condoning caving....I am not.......that is not the point. What I'm trying to say is we all have our demons (one of which we all share together). When we wake up and look at ourselves in the mirror remember you are not alone.....you are not a bad person.....and to forgive yourself for whatever has happened in the past. It is a new day...a new life. Go live it....there is more to this life than cancer treated tobacco.

 

I have accomplished a lot in this past year........but nothing more important than kicking tobacco to the curb. But the one thing I think I have learned that means so much is to forgive myself......don't beat myself up.....and look at what is right....not what's wrong.

 

Thank You QSSN..........not just a tobacco quit site......a life/game changer!

 

D Bob (Andy)

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My name is don I quit today 1-24-16 I found this site and I think it will help. I have chewed since I was 19 I'm now 31 I w want to be alive and healthy for my wife and kids

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My name is don I quit today 1-24-16 I found this site and I think it will help. I have chewed since I was 19 I'm now 31 I w want to be alive and healthy for my wife and kids

Welcome, daddon! You are correct, this site will help you quit. If you follow the advice laid out in roll call, it's foolproof.

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Names Chris, today is day 3, the fog sucks pretty bad right now. Quiting for myself. I'm to young at the age of 24 to be stuck humping the can any longer.

 

Thanks for the support.

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Well, it's Wednesday night and I'm sitting in one of my college classes with a stirn face and a mouth full of sunflower seeds. I pledged to quit chew for the probably 7th time(?) yesterday and God am I irritable. It all started when I was 15 years old with a bunch of my buddies who I played summer baseball with. We saw our coaches doing it, we looked up to them, so obviously we had to get our hands on it and be cool like them. I was young and stupid and I fell into a trap that took me about 7 years to realize. I dipped everyday, probably about 8-12 times a day but I stopped dipping long cut about 4 years ago and transferred to pouches in fear of people realizing I dip in just about every situation (easier to hide). I was a lifelong baseball player, went to college to play, and was engulfed in the romanticization of dipping. After a career ending injury, here I am stuck with a habit that was the product of one of the best experiences of my life. I'm about 36 hours into it and I have my family behind me, my mother (a breast cancer survivor) is my rock and reminds me why I'm doing this because well, she knows firsthand how much cancer sucks. This website has been an overflow of amazing resources, and I'll frequently post to this forum because I'm going to need the support, I'm nowhere near conquering my addiction but I'm on the right path with the right attitude.

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Names Chris, today is day 3, the fog sucks pretty bad right now. Quiting for myself. I'm to young at the age of 24 to be stuck humping the can any longer.

 

Thanks for the support.

Good to have you on board, Chris! I wish I had the foresight to quit at 24. It took me till 38. Stick with it, one day at a time. Post roll. Hang out, we will help you.

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Well, it's Wednesday night and I'm sitting in one of my college classes with a stirn face and a mouth full of sunflower seeds. I pledged to quit chew for the probably 7th time(?) yesterday and God am I irritable. It all started when I was 15 years old with a bunch of my buddies who I played summer baseball with. We saw our coaches doing it, we looked up to them, so obviously we had to get our hands on it and be cool like them. I was young and stupid and I fell into a trap that took me about 7 years to realize. I dipped everyday, probably about 8-12 times a day but I stopped dipping long cut about 4 years ago and transferred to pouches in fear of people realizing I dip in just about every situation (easier to hide). I was a lifelong baseball player, went to college to play, and was engulfed in the romanticization of dipping. After a career ending injury, here I am stuck with a habit that was the product of one of the best experiences of my life. I'm about 36 hours into it and I have my family behind me, my mother (a breast cancer survivor) is my rock and reminds me why I'm doing this because well, she knows firsthand how much cancer sucks. This website has been an overflow of amazing resources, and I'll frequently post to this forum because I'm going to need the support, I'm nowhere near conquering my addiction but I'm on the right path with the right attitude.

Man, glad to have another quitter on board. You are right, we are all addicts. You have made a great decision! Stick with it the rest of today. We will worry about tomorrow later. Deal?

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Well, it's Wednesday night and I'm sitting in one of my college classes with a stirn face and a mouth full of sunflower seeds. I pledged to quit chew for the probably 7th time(?) yesterday and God am I irritable. It all started when I was 15 years old with a bunch of my buddies who I played summer baseball with. We saw our coaches doing it, we looked up to them, so obviously we had to get our hands on it and be cool like them. I was young and stupid and I fell into a trap that took me about 7 years to realize. I dipped everyday, probably about 8-12 times a day but I stopped dipping long cut about 4 years ago and transferred to pouches in fear of people realizing I dip in just about every situation (easier to hide). I was a lifelong baseball player, went to college to play, and was engulfed in the romanticization of dipping. After a career ending injury, here I am stuck with a habit that was the product of one of the best experiences of my life. I'm about 36 hours into it and I have my family behind me, my mother (a breast cancer survivor) is my rock and reminds me why I'm doing this because well, she knows firsthand how much cancer sucks. This website has been an overflow of amazing resources, and I'll frequently post to this forum because I'm going to need the support, I'm nowhere near conquering my addiction but I'm on the right path with the right attitude.

Man, glad to have another quitter on board. You are right, we are all addicts. You have made a great decision! Stick with it the rest of today. We will worry about tomorrow later. Deal?

 

Appreciate the support, and that sounds like a deal to me my friend. I'll check back in tomorrow.

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Well, it's Wednesday night and I'm sitting in one of my college classes with a stirn face and a mouth full of sunflower seeds. I pledged to quit chew for the probably 7th time(?) yesterday and God am I irritable. It all started when I was 15 years old with a bunch of my buddies who I played summer baseball with. We saw our coaches doing it, we looked up to them, so obviously we had to get our hands on it and be cool like them. I was young and stupid and I fell into a trap that took me about 7 years to realize. I dipped everyday, probably about 8-12 times a day but I stopped dipping long cut about 4 years ago and transferred to pouches in fear of people realizing I dip in just about every situation (easier to hide). I was a lifelong baseball player, went to college to play, and was engulfed in the romanticization of dipping. After a career ending injury, here I am stuck with a habit that was the product of one of the best experiences of my life. I'm about 36 hours into it and I have my family behind me, my mother (a breast cancer survivor) is my rock and reminds me why I'm doing this because well, she knows firsthand how much cancer sucks. This website has been an overflow of amazing resources, and I'll frequently post to this forum because I'm going to need the support, I'm nowhere near conquering my addiction but I'm on the right path with the right attitude.

Man, glad to have another quitter on board. You are right, we are all addicts. You have made a great decision! Stick with it the rest of today. We will worry about tomorrow later. Deal?

 

Appreciate the support, and that sounds like a deal to me my friend. I'll check back in tomorrow.

 

So, are you still with us man?

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Still here man, cravings are there but I'm staying strong. Chewing a shit ton of sunflower seeds and picking up extra shifts at work to keep my mind off of it. But so far so good.

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Still here man, cravings are there but I'm staying strong. Chewing a shit ton of sunflower seeds and picking up extra shifts at work to keep my mind off of it. But so far so good.

post roll, I nedsome more friends!

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Brand new quit month has opened up for 2016. It needs some quitters to occupy it. Come on, I know you're dying to quit.

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Howdy all,

 

I'm finally going for the long run. This is my second time at it, but I've made it to day 11 before. I'm finally done with the short-fused, anti-social tendencies that come with chewing. It's time to grab the bull by its horns and go for the withdrawal ride.

 

Day one was not entirely bad until it was about time for sleep. I couldn't find deep sleep even when I tried meditating the nicotine demon away. Argueably the worst sleep I can remember for the past few months, but after waking up, the sense of accomplishment for pushing through it was outstanding.

 

Day two, as of right now, is the day where I'll be switching between sunflower seeds and sparing use of SMC pouches. Its the closest thing to Grizz Wintergreen that I've been chewing for 5 years. I'll have to replace the pouches with the cotton ball trick or at the desk workouts.

 

Tips to others that are looking to quick:

Be open about it and tell your friends/family

Set a goal about a month out and try your best to hold off from chewing (even if its for another 30min past 2 hours)

Hell, tell your coworkers so they understand you'll be on edge for a bit.

Write down your reasons to quit, keep that list on your person when you're quitting.

While you can't get rid of a bad habit, you can change the routine. Find an activity that can replace your chewing routine. Exercise, hobby, ect.

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Howdy all,

 

I'm finally going for the long run. This is my second time at it, but I've made it to day 11 before. I'm finally done with the short-fused, anti-social tendencies that come with chewing. It's time to grab the bull by its horns and go for the withdrawal ride.

 

Day one was not entirely bad until it was about time for sleep. I couldn't find deep sleep even when I tried meditating the nicotine demon away. Argueably the worst sleep I can remember for the past few months, but after waking up, the sense of accomplishment for pushing through it was outstanding.

 

Day two, as of right now, is the day where I'll be switching between sunflower seeds and sparing use of SMC pouches. Its the closest thing to Grizz Wintergreen that I've been chewing for 5 years. I'll have to replace the pouches with the cotton ball trick or at the desk workouts.

 

Tips to others that are looking to quick:

Be open about it and tell your friends/family

Set a goal about a month out and try your best to hold off from chewing (even if its for another 30min past 2 hours)

Hell, tell your coworkers so they understand you'll be on edge for a bit.

Write down your reasons to quit, keep that list on your person when you're quitting.

While you can't get rid of a bad habit, you can change the routine. Find an activity that can replace your chewing routine. Exercise, hobby, ect.

Welcome Warthog! Looks like you got a damn fine list going there. You know the drill. Embrace the suck. What you are going through now feels like hell. And it is. It sucks. So, get through the next crave and fight until the end of the day. Read as much as you can on here. There is a TON of good info contained in these pages. Stay strong, bro. Hope to see you in roll call.

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Welcome Warthog! Looks like you got a damn fine list going there. You know the drill. Embrace the suck. What you are going through now feels like hell. And it is. It sucks. So, get through the next crave and fight until the end of the day. Read as much as you can on here. There is a TON of good info contained in these pages. Stay strong, bro. Hope to see you in roll call.

 

Thanks, Tiger. I appreciate the welcome. I'll see you around!

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Quit about a month ago and now it feels like I'm having a heart attack every night. Been to the er twice ekg was good blood pressure is great since quitting. Doctors said I have anxiety now. Any ideas

Edited by Pops4812

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Well, it's Wednesday night and I'm sitting in one of my college classes with a stirn face and a mouth full of sunflower seeds. I pledged to quit chew for the probably 7th time(?) yesterday and God am I irritable. It all started when I was 15 years old with a bunch of my buddies who I played summer baseball with. We saw our coaches doing it, we looked up to them, so obviously we had to get our hands on it and be cool like them. I was young and stupid and I fell into a trap that took me about 7 years to realize. I dipped everyday, probably about 8-12 times a day but I stopped dipping long cut about 4 years ago and transferred to pouches in fear of people realizing I dip in just about every situation (easier to hide). I was a lifelong baseball player, went to college to play, and was engulfed in the romanticization of dipping. After a career ending injury, here I am stuck with a habit that was the product of one of the best experiences of my life. I'm about 36 hours into it and I have my family behind me, my mother (a breast cancer survivor) is my rock and reminds me why I'm doing this because well, she knows firsthand how much cancer sucks. This website has been an overflow of amazing resources, and I'll frequently post to this forum because I'm going to need the support, I'm nowhere near conquering my addiction but I'm on the right path with the right attitude.

Man, glad to have another quitter on board. You are right, we are all addicts. You have made a great decision! Stick with it the rest of today. We will worry about tomorrow later. Deal?
Appreciate the support, and that sounds like a deal to me my friend. I'll check back in tomorrow.
So, are you still with us man?

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Well, it's Wednesday night and I'm sitting in one of my college classes with a stirn face and a mouth full of sunflower seeds. I pledged to quit chew for the probably 7th time(?) yesterday and God am I irritable. It all started when I was 15 years old with a bunch of my buddies who I played summer baseball with. We saw our coaches doing it, we looked up to them, so obviously we had to get our hands on it and be cool like them. I was young and stupid and I fell into a trap that took me about 7 years to realize. I dipped everyday, probably about 8-12 times a day but I stopped dipping long cut about 4 years ago and transferred to pouches in fear of people realizing I dip in just about every situation (easier to hide). I was a lifelong baseball player, went to college to play, and was engulfed in the romanticization of dipping. After a career ending injury, here I am stuck with a habit that was the product of one of the best experiences of my life. I'm about 36 hours into it and I have my family behind me, my mother (a breast cancer survivor) is my rock and reminds me why I'm doing this because well, she knows firsthand how much cancer sucks. This website has been an overflow of amazing resources, and I'll frequently post to this forum because I'm going to need the support, I'm nowhere near conquering my addiction but I'm on the right path with the right attitude.

Man, glad to have another quitter on board. You are right, we are all addicts. You have made a great decision! Stick with it the rest of today. We will worry about tomorrow later. Deal?
Appreciate the support, and that sounds like a deal to me my friend. I'll check back in tomorrow.
So, are you still with us man?

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Well, it's Wednesday night and I'm sitting in one of my college classes with a stirn face and a mouth full of sunflower seeds. I pledged to quit chew for the probably 7th time(?) yesterday and God am I irritable. It all started when I was 15 years old with a bunch of my buddies who I played summer baseball with. We saw our coaches doing it, we looked up to them, so obviously we had to get our hands on it and be cool like them. I was young and stupid and I fell into a trap that took me about 7 years to realize. I dipped everyday, probably about 8-12 times a day but I stopped dipping long cut about 4 years ago and transferred to pouches in fear of people realizing I dip in just about every situation (easier to hide). I was a lifelong baseball player, went to college to play, and was engulfed in the romanticization of dipping. After a career ending injury, here I am stuck with a habit that was the product of one of the best experiences of my life. I'm about 36 hours into it and I have my family behind me, my mother (a breast cancer survivor) is my rock and reminds me why I'm doing this because well, she knows firsthand how much cancer sucks. This website has been an overflow of amazing resources, and I'll frequently post to this forum because I'm going to need the support, I'm nowhere near conquering my addiction but I'm on the right path with the right attitude.

Man, glad to have another quitter on board. You are right, we are all addicts. You have made a great decision! Stick with it the rest of today. We will worry about tomorrow later. Deal?
Appreciate the support, and that sounds like a deal to me my friend. I'll check back in tomorrow.
So, are you still with us man?

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