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Quit Smokeless Community

wastepanel

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wastepanel last won the day on January 29 2012

wastepanel had the most liked content!

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About wastepanel

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 01/14/1978

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.killthecan.org

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Ohio

Profile Fields

  • Quit Date
    06/28/2011

Recent Profile Visitors

576 profile views
  1. if you're an addict, please say "aye"

  2. I’ve done it. I’ve made it to 100 days. I’m in the Hall of Fame. It’s been quite the journey. I’ve been through every emotion that is possible. In fact, I’m from Ohio. One of the jokes we make in Ohio is that the greatest thing about the weather here is that you can experience all four seasons (winter, spring, summer, and fall) in one day. We also like “Michigan sucks” jokes. My quit has been a lot like the weather here. I look back at the beginning of my quit and cringe at what I went through in just the first week of the quit. Although the quit began with a bang of celebration (much like New Year’s), I lost all hope quickly in the cold of life without chew. Here is a post that I made on day 5: This day was my breaking point. The next day I printed Tom Kern’s story (and his wife’s letter) and posted it prominently on my kitchen bulletin board. Despite me hating the world, I trudged through the blizzard that was falling down around me and didn’t blink. That was when I realized I could control what I did and didn’t do even if my body said that I couldn’t. After a few weeks, I was amazed at how easy quitting came. Suddenly, I was one month into my quit and considering a purchase of stock in Smokey Mountain Snuff. I put away my winter coat for my spring jacket. I still had cravings, but they were scattered between some sunny days too. I started to push myself (mainly because I was excited not be addicted or that I wasn’t constantly miserable) to do things that triggered my former habit. It was going to be a great summer. Summer is a great time of the year. The sun is out. Kids are outside playing. My world was exposed to even more things that I could do in this phase now that I was free of the nicotine monkey. Unfortunately, it’s not sunny 100% of the time in summer. Think back to when you were a child. Wasn’t it the most depressing when it rained during the summer? It was. Summer is meant for fun, and when the fun is broken by a few craves, it seems worse than what it was. Craves in this stage seem to be the worst because they surprise you more. Your mind and body don’t need or want the stuff, but they come. The key is to remember that tomorrow is another day. If I don’t golf today due to the rain, there will be tomorrow or next week. When fall rolled in, you would think I was magically cured. I wasn’t. In fact, I never will be. I posted this a few weeks ago: It was during the fall stage of my quit that I realized that I was always going to be an addict. I would go through all of seasons again and again throughout my life. Just because I’ve quit doesn’t mean that I’ll stay quit if I let my guard down for a moment. This is something that I must battle my whole life. Even though I’ve enjoyed the year, it’s depressing that it’s over. I’ve made it through all of the seasons. Some days were bad, and some were good. Some days I had all four seasons in one day. That’s the nature of the beast that we all must battle. It’s hard, and you’re not going to be magically cured when you reach each milestone. But it feels great when you reach them. That’s something you fall back on. When I hold my son in my arms, he’ll never know what hell I went through in hopes that he won’t be inspired by my stupidity or that he’ll bury his father when he is a teenager. My wife will never know how much of an inspiration she has been to me, and she will never be able to understand my addiction enough to help me. All she needs to do is be there for me, and she has been in this beginning stage of my quit. This website has been wonderful to get me through some very bad days. If I was down, or if I was craving too hard, I came here. I would laugh at Ruxxy and his craziness. I would visit our website and vow that I would join once I hit 100 days. I’d get random PMs asking me if I was ok if I didn’t post for a day or two. I cried when Diggy caved. He was one day ahead of me, and it happened around day 52 of my quit. It broke my confidence, and yet it resolved me to try harder. You all have been wonderful, and I have been encouraging every friend and family member that is me 101 days ago today to join this site. It’s not Day 100 for me. It’s New Year’s Day. Hope is eternal, and this new year is going to be great.
  3. Day 2. I thought I was going to lose my mind yesterday. Today, I'm slightly more relaxed and made use of my gym membership as my body decided 3:00 am was a good wakeup call. Hello all, and I look forward to posting here. Anybody know if they make the non-tobacco chew in long cut? All I could get was the short stuff.
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