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7iron

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About 7iron

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  • Birthday 01/25/1967

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  1. Wow. I have not been in here for a long time. I saw maquit's avatar of the QSSN HOF coin and got to wondering where my coin is. I used to carry it every day and never thought I would stop. I gotta find that. I worked hard for it and I need to remember what it took to keep that daily, hourly, every minute promise. Quiting the use of snuff was the most difficult thing I have ever had to do. It is also the most worthwhile. I went to the original QSSN site to check my quit tracker and it says 2,796 days quit. There were many celebrations along the way. All the 30 day increments. 180 days, one year ... two. Earning my comma. Seems like I lived here at this site. I wrote a lot, posted a lot, chatted a lot. What I did, what so many people here do, and why this is so successful, is I invested in my quit. I did everything I could possibly do to win. I probably spent thousands of hours on this site. I made caving so embarassing that I couldn't do it. I was tempted for sure ... and often. But I teamed with like minded people and I set myself up to beat my addiction. I thought, and wrote, and said "no tobacco today" so many times. I engraved that on my coin. One day at a time. That's it. You can't quit forever, but you can stay quit today. The only thing tobacco is good for is keeping you addicted to tobacco. You don't need it. And in time, you won't even want it. Perhaps the reason I stumbled back in here is Thanksgiving. I really am grateful for this site and Flavious Victor and for Dave and the original QSSN site. I purchased my freedom here. Thanks guys! 7
  2. Golfing is for golfers and people who really like watching Caddyshack a thousand times while smoking grass.

  3. Phil, that was a great post. Part of the problem is that some people view this place as a site to only quit smokeless...I viewed it as a place to quit nicotine with a bunch of guys who, like myself, used smokeless as their main delivery source. It was not until these discussions came about that I realized really how strong the nic bitch really is. She has made many people here focus in on a single word to give themselves an out to let her back in. I really do hate that bitch!! When I was a teenager, seems lie everyone around me dipped or smoked. In college, the number of people I knew using tobacco products decreased, but the actual personal usage increased (myself included). By the time I quit at age 39, most everyone I knew was a non-tobacco using person. So when I quit, it was difficult, but at least I did not have the compounded temptation of all my friends and co-workers still dipping in front of me. There were; however, several offers of cigars over the last [almost] 5 years. Generally, my decline would include a "No thanks, I quit using tobacco" comment. And generally, the response would be, "Really? It's just a cigar." For me, it wouldn't be just a cigar. And it wouldn't be just a cave. It would be saying, "Welcome back" to the very thing I've been running from the last 5 years. It's not worth the risk.
  4. I'm doing some reading on-line tonight. Read some HOF speeches. Good stuff! I had a temptation tonight - I think that's why I'm here. Went to a b-day party tonight with my family and there was a poker game and cigars. I was offered a nice cigar. I briefly wondered if it would be "okay". Heck, I've been quit over 4 years. Can I enjoy a cigar now? I really would like to ... honestly, but I decided against it. It just seemed to not be worth it. A few hours later now. Am I sad that I did not have the cigar? No, I'm truly glad I stayed strong. For those of you just starting out, I know quitting is tough. But it gets much easier. I rarely, very rarely, ever think about snuff anymore. You will get there too. Just say "no tobacco today" and do everything necessary to keep that promise. Then you'll be golden! I have not thought about any form of tobacco in months until tonight. And frankly tonight was not all that difficult to say "no". Trust me, it's worth it to stay qut.
  5. I wrote this quite a while ago ... thought it might help someone ... One Day at a Time By the way, we "veterans" know what you guys are going through because we have been there in your shoes. Today marks day 365 of my quit. You may look at that number and seriously wonder how you will ever get that far. If that is your question, then here is my answer ... one day at a time. As cliche as that may sound, it is the truth. No matter how hard you fight, no matter how many cravings you battle through, no matter how many headaches, fits of dip rage or periods of constipation you endure, you can only do this one day at a time. Certainly it would be nice to do all the hard work of quitting at the beginning and get it over with so that afterwards you could just coast. It doesn't work that way. Each and every day you get to make a choice. Will you, or will you not, return to the open arms of tobacco. Will you, or will you not, deny the self indulgent side of you that is ready to throw in the towel. Will you, or will you not, say "no tobacco today", mean it and stick to it no matter what circumstances you encounter today. This site is a community of individuals quitting smokeless tobacco. Each and every day that we all succeed in keeping the "no tobacco today" promise is a victory. So when you need help, ask, and watch as the wagons begin to circle. You may want to wander in to some of the other, older quit groups. In some of these groups, on any given day, you may see very little dialogue specifically related to smokeless tobacco cessation. I can assure you this is not because we have been "cured". However, it is because we are no longer completely consumed by our quits. We have reached a point where learning a new recipe for brisket, discussing the merits of a certain vacation destination or arguing about the officiating during yesterday's game is also worth talking about. We still keep our guards up for sure, but sometimes we just have fun, joke around and enjoy the freedom we have acquired. I mention this to give you hope. Yes, quitting still requires a one day at a time commitment, but each day gets better and staying quit becomes easier. I know some of you are having a really difficult time. I've walked in your shoes. Keep in mind that the pain you are currently experiencing is the currency with which you will purchase your freedom. The path to freedom is a well traveled one. Many, many ex-tobacco users have secured their freedom within these walls. They acquired the tools necessary to battle their addiction and many have chronicled their stories here ... The Hall of Fame Speeches I think you will find encouragement in these words. They found the help they needed right here where you are. Remember that every step away from tobacco is one step closer to freedom. So stay strong and stay quit!!
  6. April 1, 2006 was the last time I dipped Cope. Have not dipped since. Have not smoked. No Cigars. Have not inhaled. At the beginning of my quit, there were times the first weeks, and even months, that I ached for a dip of snuff. I longed for it. I missed it. I even felt incomplete without it. Sad ... but true. Fast forward 4 years. In March, I thought about my 4 year anniversary a couple times. I was looking forward to it and was (and am) proud of it. I mentioned it to my wife and she was proud of me too. And then April 1st just came and went. I totally forgot about it. The thing is, I remember the milestones along the way. I remember the first few days. One week quit. Ten days. Twenty. One month. Two. Three. 100 days ... and longer. The mere fact that I forgot about my fourth year anniversary though is a huge blessing. I've grown accustomed to being quit and tobacco free, and I really did look forward to celebrating 4 years free of tobacco. But I'm glad that other things in my life took precedence. I'm glad I forgot about quitting. It's been a few days into my fifth year of freedom now and I just want to encourage those starting out to hang in there. Nicotine addiction is tough to beat, but you can do it. I did.
  7. Dear friend, I am truly sorry that you are experiencing this pain and discomfort. Perhaps it is a bit stronger and lasting longer than you expected it would. Perhaps you are feeling like you really were not prepared for this kind of struggle ... I don't know, but I can tell you this: You are not alone and honestly, you are not more addicted than the rest of us either. The mental anguish you are dealing with will go away, the feelings of loss and boredom and doom will fade ... they ALWAYS do. If you could only see things from my vantage point. I know this has been hell for you. Do not forget, I went through it too. But now I've been walking away from tobacco for well over three years. I can see so much more clearly now ... you need to get to a similar spot. The only way to do that is just tackle each day and decide that NO MATTER WHAT, you are gonna stay clean. Please believe me that life will indeed get better and staying quit will truly get easier. Just continue to distance yourself from tobacco and both of these things will become reality. It's somewhat like this old, familiar story ... Two Wolves One evening an old man told his grandson about a struggle that goes on inside people. He said, "My son, the battle is between 2 'wolves' inside us all. One is Evil. It is anger, envy, jealousy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority and ego. The other is Good. It is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion and faith." The grandson thought about it for a minute and asked, "Grandfather, which wolf wins?" The old man replied simply, "The one you choose to feed." In some ways, this story very concisely puts quitting into perspective. There remains in each of us, a continuous fight. There is the ugly side ... called addiction. And there is the beautiful side ... called freedom. These two sides cannot coexist. One will win and one will lose. The one that wins will do so because it is well cared for, nurtured and fed. The loser will be defeated due to starvation and neglect. Certainly, the mere fact we are here reading and posting on this website is proof that we want to be free from the bonds of nicotine addiction. And yet, there is this other part of us, the part that wants the security of our addiction. As nicotine junkies, we have a choice. We can choose to feed the part of us struggling to be free or we can choose to feed the part of us that secretly wants to return to the open arms of tobacco. Feed the good wolf. The part of you that desires freedom; the one you were born to be. Feed this part of you, nurture it, watch as this wolf gains strength and eventually dominates the other. Be strong, take courage ... stay quit!
  8. Well, you'll be a monster for a while unfortunately. Take it out on people here rather than your loved ones. We understand what you're going thru. The dip dreams are real. I think most people have them. I remember them being especially "real" and waking up thinking I caved. In the end, I think they actually helped solidify my resolve. I don't remember having them after 100 days or so. I never had twitches, but you're likely not alone on that one either. Hang in there, it gets a lot easier as you get down the road a bit. "No tobacco today" is what got me quit. Trying to quit forever is darn near impossible. Just take it one day at a time. Decide for yourself that no matter what you are gonna stay clean today. Deal with tomorrow ... tomorrow. That is the way to secure your freedom. 7iron day 1353 still clean
  9. My day started with waking up in a tent ... in the back yard. I had promised my kids and their cousin a "camp out" so we toasted marshmallows over the BBQ last night and froze last night in a tent. It was awesome and they loved it. Went to church, had lunch with friends, did some shopping ... and thought nothing at all about tobacco. I am so glad to read Bluesman's post. He is a real life hero for me. I fed on what he wrote the first few weeks of my quit. I am glad he is doing well and that being a dad, husband and coach has become more important since quitting tobacco. I echo that. I too have been liberated from 24 years of tobacco use. Copenhagen ... it satisfies. Except, it doesn't. Not long term. Thanks Bluesman for helping me break free. Thanks for what you wrote, then and now. And thanks for coining the term ... No Tobacco Today. One day at a time. No matter what, you can do it. You can stay quit today. Just today. Do anything, do everything, just stay quit today. There is nothing more important than staying clean from tobacco today. Do not worry about tomorrow. Do not attempt to make a "I will quit FOREVER promise". Just stay quit for today. You CAN do it. Many people, just as addicted as you, have done the same. NO Tobacco Today! 7iron day 1318 still clean
  10. Most don't use it too long, but I did. I used it for 3-4 months, then quit for a few weeks, then went back to it when I had some tough cravings, stopped again, used again for a while (when I was eating too much and wanted something other than snacks for the oral fixation), then stopped. I don't recall the last time I used it (Smokey Mountain snuff), but it's probably been almost 2 years. I just recently hit the 3 year quit mark. I know at least one guy with more days that still uses the fake snuff occasionally. I wouldn't worry about it too much if I were you. But for me, even the fake snuff was causing my gums to recede and my teeth to stay an off-white color. Plus, I don't feel like a hick with a dip in my lip and a cup on my desk, even if it's just the fake crap. The important thing is to keep tobacco and/or nicotine products out of your mouth. Congrats on 3 weeks without tobacco! I started back up on SMC last week. Bought 2 cans - 1 classic, 1 wintergreen and mixed them. I have gone through half a can worth in the past week I actually didn't use the fake stuff. My substitute was cotton balls. They mimicked the feel of a dip better than anything else. I don't know how long I used them. It seemed like a long time but my need and the use just gradually faded away. Like killer said, don't worry about how long you use a substitute, just stay away from the nicotine. I dipped over a can a day of bacc-off or smokey mountain the first month and slowly, just naturally, tapered off over the first year. Herbal snuff is not addictive. Use it in whatever quantity, and as often as you need to, in order to not dip real snuff. You will eventually lose interest. No tobacco today ... that is the important thing.
  11. One Day at a Time By the way, we "veterans" know what you guys are going through because we have been there in your shoes. Today marks day 1256 of my quit. You may look at that number and seriously wonder how you will ever get that far. If that is your question, then here is my answer ... one day at a time. As cliche as that may sound, it is the truth. No matter how hard you fight, no matter how many cravings you battle through, no matter how many headaches, fits of dip rage or periods of constipation you endure, you can only do this one day at a time. Certainly it would be nice to do all the hard work of quitting at the beginning and get it over with so that afterwards you could just coast. It doesn't work that way. Each and every day you get to make a choice. Will you, or will you not, return to the open arms of tobacco. Will you, or will you not, deny the self indulgent side of you that is ready to throw in the towel. Will you, or will you not, say "no tobacco today", mean it and stick to it no matter what circumstances you encounter today. This site is a community of individuals quitting smokeless tobacco. Each and every day that we all succeed in keeping the "no tobacco today" promise is a victory. So when you need help, ask, and watch as the wagons begin to circle. You may want to wander in to some of the other, older quit groups. In some of these groups, on any given day, you may see very little dialogue specifically related to smokeless tobacco cessation. I can assure you this is not because we have been "cured". However, it is because we are no longer completely consumed by our quits. We have reached a point where learning a new recipe for brisket, discussing the merits of a certain vacation destination or arguing about the officiating during yesterday's game is also worth talking about. We still keep our guards up for sure, but sometimes we just have fun, joke around and enjoy the freedom we have acquired. I mention this to give you hope. Yes, quitting still requires a one day at a time commitment, but each day gets better and staying quit becomes easier. I know some of you are having a really difficult time. I've walked in your shoes. Keep in mind that the pain you are currently experiencing is the currency with which you will purchase your freedom. The path to freedom is a well traveled one. Many, many ex-tobacco users have secured their freedom within these walls. They acquired the tools necessary to battle their addiction and many have chronicled their stories here ... The Hall of Fame Speeches I think you will find encouragement in these words. They found the help they needed right here where you are. Remember that every step away from tobacco is one step closer to freedom. So stay strong and stay quit!!
  12. Yep ... lots of similarities here too. Read my HOF speech and you'll see you're not alone. Plus, it's really long and will put you to sleep Another piece of advice that is important: Tell EVERYONE that you quit. People you call friends and people you don't. People you know and strangers. Tell your boss, your employees, your pastor, your teacher, your students, your kids, your wife ... tell all of them. That you quit tobacco! Make the prospect of caving so embarassing that you will never do it. 7iron day 1250 still clean!
  13. and this one saved my ass a few times ... Spongebob Mantra by Spongebob © 2002 There is only one thing that I must accomplish today, and that is to not chew. If I get other things done today, great. But everything else has second priority for now. Soon I'll be able to focus on those other things too. But for right now, for today, this is the only thing that matters. I won't demand more of myself, and I won't get down on myself for not doing anything else if I don't get to it. This is damn damn damn hard work, and it's the most important work that I have right now. I'll be truly and sincerely proud if I meet no goals today other than keeping that crap out of my mouth.
  14. Are You Desperate? 1000 days! 500 days! One year quit! The 100 day Hall of Fame! These are all really impressive milestones. Of course, the only way to get there is to first get through today, then tackle the next day. Pretty amazing how fast the days add up though. I was just thinking recently about my first month off the poo. Time felt like it was standing still. I must have checked my watch every three minutes. All I wanted was to get through a day, then the next. Get through a week ... whew! Then another ... finally two weeks. [when are these headaches gonna stop?] Damn, will I ever get to a point where I don't think about cope ALL the friggin' time?? Just gotta hang on ... it's bound to get better. Okay, three weeks, things are starting to get better ... Oh, wait ... no, they aren't. Why is not putting snuff in my mouth so difficult? If I can just make it til one month. This is just too hard. For some reason, I just have an especially strong desire to chew tobacco. Maybe I should just give up?? This constant fog I'm living in sucks. Will it ever go away? Crap, why can't I think about anything other than copendookie or my quit? What the hell is wrong with me. I know others who have quit smoking and dipping. Seems like it wasn't that big of a deal for them. Seriously, I don't know if I can do this anymore ... I was at about 3 weeks quit when I found this place. I read everything I could. I was amazed, truly shocked, that I was just like many others. Yes, they had found quitting to be very difficult, but also very worthwhile. What was their secret? Desperation. That seems to be the key ingredient in a successful quit. Desperation leads to action. Action results in change and positive change is what we need. You see, if you are desperate to quit, you will find a way. You will try everything, you will do anything to quit. What is that you say? You aren't sure you want to quit? You wish you had never started, but you don't really want to quit. You enjoy dipping too much to quit. What's that? Oh, I see, you wish you wanted to quit. Yeah, I get it - coz then you would quit. Yeah, right. Newsflash dumbass - I think deep down inside, if you're honest with yourself, you'll admit that really ... you are desperate to quit! You are just being deceived by the thoughts swirling around inside your own head. Yes, I had these thoughts too. The ones that keep reminding you of how much you want tobacco, how much you need it, how difficult life would be without it ... and the kicker ... would you even enjoy life without it? Go ahead ... keep trying to convince yourself that you really want this crap in your life. You're not fooling me. I know deep down you want to be free from the shackles of addiction nicotine has placed on you. The reality of the situation is you are desperate. Perhaps you have already quit, but now you find that your stamina is failing. Staying quit is hard. It's like a seven day work week. No weekends, no holidays, no vacations ... an endless job. You know you need to stay the course and stay quit, but ... Are you desperate? Maybe just one. Just one dip. Heck, maybe just one can. A little break from this quit and some time to re-evaluate life, clear your head ... Sounds pretty desperate to me. That's okay ... nothing wrong with being desperate. Like I mentioned, desperate people take action to facilitate change. So what now? You're still reading. Did something stir within you? What do you do next? First, you make a promise, or renew your promise, to not use tobacco today. Then you DO ANYTHING to keep that promise. And when you need help, ask for it. There are plenty of people on this forum to aid you in your quest to be tobacco free. So what will that freedom give you? I think a better question to start with is what has tobacco taken from you? Time away from loved ones, the trust of your spouse or your parents, your money, your self respect, your health ... we could continue, but you get the idea. So what will freedom give you? My initial reasons for quitting were primarily health and guilt related, but I have come to realize another very important aspect of staying quit. It gives me the freedom to simply say "No!" Every time I had plunged my fingers into that can of cope, I was gratifying my self indulgent nature. 24 years of doing what I wanted with little regard for anyone else. Simply put, I had been incredibly selfish. Now I am free to be the husband, father, son, brother, friend that I was created to be - not the one controlled by an addiction to nicotine.
  15. No Tobacco Today Remember that the way to battle this addiction is one day at a time. Each and every day, say "no tobacco today", mean it and stick to it. This is how you will secure your freedom. It is important that you not look back. All of your past associations with dip, triggers we call them, are just that ... in the past. So do not dwell on them. Remember, you don't do that crap anymore, right?? You will begin to build new, dip-free memories and each time you do that, you will be breaking a string that binds you to the past and your reliance on chewing tobacco. Also, and more importantly, do not look to the future. If you catch yourself wondering "how will I ever enjoy life, or any aspect of it, without tobacco?" or "how can I possibly give it up forever?" you need to stop, take a breath, and say to yourself, "I'm not going to dip now." Frankly speaking, if you try to quit FOREVER, you will most likely fail. That is a monumental undertaking and why would you want to put that much pressure on yourself? Instead, no matter how bad things get, make a committment that for today, you will not use chewing tobacco. Today, you will post roll and make a promise to yourself and your quit brothers and sisters that you will not try to kill yourself by giving yourself mouth cancer or a heart attack. Today, say to yourself, say it outloud ... "No tobacco today!!"
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