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Ohioman1972

The Cafe - 2015

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Currently I am trying to get the motivation to quit dipping. I have only been dipping for 2 years now and I know that, that is nothing compared to most of the other people on here but I have decided I want to quit before I get to far. At the end of my story I have questions about starting to quit.

 

Here is My Story:

 

I stated this disgusting habit when I turned 18 because I had always saw my dad doing it when I was growing up and I wanted to try it. On my 18th birthday I went and bought my first tin and happened to like it a lot. Not long after that I was hooked. Peaking in college at around a tin a day, which was about $14 a week. I am now 20 and I have decided that enough is enough and I want to quit.

 

For about a year now, I tried to convince myself to quit but I never was able to do this successfully. All of my friends that do not dip themselves push me and I keep saying, “I am quitting soon.” When I was on winter break from college this year, my dad sat me down and talked to me about dipping. He had known I dipped for about a year and never really talked to me about it because he was doing it too. However, in the fall before he had this talk with me, he had quit this habit. Seeing someone I had looked up to all my life get the motivation to quit after over 20 years of dipping, I told myself I needed to do the same. When I started the spring semester of my sophomore year, I started to cut back to make it easier for me to quit. I was cutting back and got down to about 2 lips per day until I got a text from my mom that drastically changed my cutting back.

 

In march 2015, I was swamped with schoolwork and was in season for practice so my schedule was hectic. Then I got that text from my mom that said that we were going to have to put down our family dog. This was devastating for me because my dog had been my best friend since I was in 7th grade. After I got that news, I started to dip at excess again. Again I was at about a tin a day and when people asked about it I told them, “I was under a lot of stress and dipping is how I was dealing with it.” However now it is April and I am out of excuses. My friends have put pressure on me to quit. However, that is not my top motivation to quit. My main motivation has come from my dad and my inner motivation.

 

My dad had been chewing tobacco for over 20 years up as I stated earlier. When he sat me down, he started to conversation of with telling since I was an adult that choosing to dip or not was my choice and he was not going to tell me what to do. After that he was completed honest with me and stated that he could go on forever about the perks he got from dipping. However, then he said some things that really got to me. Instead of talking to me about the potential health risks that were involved, like every other talk people have about dipping, he told me the money involved. I had never thought about the money side of it because I was working at the time and I was not paying for my health insurance. The fact that when you pay for health insurance you have to tell them if you use tobacco products and if you do you are charged extra, which is understandable. But, on top of extra insurance you are paying around $600 dollars a year on the tobacco itself. This startled me and after that conversation I start to have an inner monologue about how I needed to quit.

 

Personally, dipping does not disgust me right now like it does to others who do not do it. However, when I see the way people look at me when I do it does disgust me. Because of that, I am unable to dip in front of some people and hide it from a lot of people. This is what really drove me to start my quitting process, however I have not started my actual quit yet.

 

The reason why I am posting this is to request help from others who were successful. What drove you to quit? How did you start your quit, cold turkey or cutting down? How did you choose a quit date? How did you receive help from your friends? How did you deal with the side effects of quitting and still be able to perform at work or school? I really just want to know how to start because it is my time to end this habit and I am terrified of the side effects but I need the final result.

 

Thank you for reading my story,

 

Miami5175

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I will take a stab at answering your questions from my point of view. Brief summary of my story: started dipping around 17 or 18 in HS. went on and off (mostly on) for about 21 or 22 years. ninja dipped (or i thought I was) once i got married in 96. set quit dates for graduate college, graduate law school, take bar exam, pass bar exam, birth of all three of my kids. hit rock bottom 08.30.2009 (wife caught me with dip on fingers and in teeth, again). much drama. ended up having to call my parents and my siblings (both doctors, one an ENT) at wife's insistence cause she could not help me and she needed help dealing with it from them. if I did not call, she would. came back to QSSN after failing earlier in 2009. 2056 days later I still try to post most days to quit for today.

 

What drove you to quit? See above. my rock bottom was truly when my wife said to me I trust you in everything implicitly except when it comes to tobacco.

 

How did you start your quit, cold turkey or cutting down? Cold Turkey. It sucks ass. the first few days are hell. you can get through it. lots of articles on here about the stages of the quit journey in the first 100 days.

 

How did you choose a quit date? just did it. no taper. my advice to you is if you really want to quit. no time like the present. there are always going to be stressors in your life to put off quitting. that is mere justification and your addiction to nicotine speaking. I can't do it now because of X. those never go away. just do it.

 

How did you receive help from your friends? I came here. this place is unique in that you go through the first stages with your group and are supported by men and women who have gone through exactly what you are/will go through. they know what its like. they understand the craves, the rage, the fog cause they have done or are doing exactly what you are doing. plus I had told people so many times I was quitting it had become a joke.

 

How did you deal with the side effects of quitting and still be able to perform at work or school? you suck it up and do it. there are ways to deal with the withdrawal. for me it was a lot of exercise, a lot of water, stuffing my face with crappy food, etc. one thing I did a lot of was put a green tea bag where dip used to go. it satisfied the oral fixation for me long after the nicotine is actually out of your system. that's the thing, the physical side is over quickly (relatively speaking), its the mental side that can F you up.

 

I really just want to know how to start because it is my time to end this habit and I am terrified of the side effects but I need the final result. for me it was just hitting that rock bottom moment of my wife saying she did not trust me. that did it. the big thing that that forced me to do was to admit to myself that I was completely and utterly addicted to nicotine. that was hard. don't let pride get in the way of that step. I think it was necessary for me to do that. Also, do not quit for someone else, quit for yourself. that way when the shit hits the fan you won't have what like to call the Fuck It/You Dip (i.e. getting pissed off or in an argument and you say, well F you, I did this for you, so I'll show you, I will start dipping again since i never really wanted to quit in the first place).

 

There is no time like today to quit. Quit for today only. Wake up tomorrow. Decide then if you quit for today as well.

 

tm - 2056

Edited by tm-va
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This question was posed on the QSSN Facebook page.

 

You go to the doctor and he tells you "I'm sorry, you have 6 months to live" Do you dip?

Edited by Tiger Refuge

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This question was posed on the QSSN Facebook page.

 

You go to the doctor and he tells you "I'm sorry, you have 6 months to live" Do you dip?

 

Not me. My thought is that I was a slave for 30 years. I have been quit for a little over 6 years now and no longer need it. Why would I want to go back to being a slave to nicotine just because it won't be the cause of my death? I like my freedom too much and I worked too hard for that freedom.

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Miami....I hope you are reading all of these post. It's like hundreds of dollars of free therapy.......And there is a ton more on the website.

 

I think tm va really nailed what needed to be said......also Duf, tiger and Donnie are right on.

 

A couple of things that stick out though.....one, is from Donnie. His rationale being that he doesn't want to be a slave to nicotine is absolutely my main reason for staying quit. Until you have freedom from it you forget how much you live to simply put cancer dirt in your mouth. If I could take a dip every once in awhile I probably would....BUT, I can't. The saying that fits me as well as most everyone on the site is "One dip is to many and a thousand is never enough." That's a powerful statement......and unfortunately so true it hurts sometimes. But I will say this.......being on this site and seeing the success of so many helps my resolve when I think about "just one".

 

One other thing is NRT. Just my 2 cents and a nickel......I wouldn't touch it. I chewed nicotine gum for a long ass time thinking it was ok because it is not tobacco. All it did was keep me hooked on nicotine and when the time was right I would have a dipped packed in my lip before you could say........well, you know what I mean.

 

Miami....you are in a unique situation. Most guys don't get serious about quitting until they have been doing it for way to long (Mine was a 25 year habit). At your age with only 2 years of dipping you can probably remember what it was like to "not dip". For a lot of us it was such a distant memory of living without dip that we thought life might end (ridiculous now that I'm quit....but I actually thought I would have no joy in life).

 

So.......still think you can't do it? Well we have all said that.....and multiple times. If you wan to quit, you will. Keep reading and start posting!

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Miami -

I applaud you for having the courage and insight to post your thoughts and questions here. You seem to be a very insightful and introspective person. Many people, including me, will take years and even decades of their life to discover the truth about themselves and tobacco addiction.

I have written a great deal about “my story” ... (maybe too much!!)

http://forum.qssn.org/index.php/topic/394-the-secret-of-our-success/

http://forum.qssn.org/index.php/topic/409-do-anything/

http://forum.qssn.org/index.php/topic/408-one-year-ago/

http://forum.qssn.org/index.php/topic/412-two-years/

http://forum.qssn.org/index.php/topic/413-three-years/

http://forum.qssn.org/index.php/topic/414-four-years/

http://forum.qssn.org/index.php/topic/415-five-years/

At its very core, lthis addiction feeds on mental weakness, various self-perpetuating lies and rationalizations, as you have already discovered and experienced .... I can hear it in your voice. You feel like you have your father’s tacit acceptance and approval. You felt sad because your dog died. You personally do not find chewing tobacco to be a disgusting habit. You falsely believe that this is a $600 per year problem.

Miami, these are half-truths at best, and more likely, just nonsense. You really think your father is okay that you acquiring his deadly, cancer-causing habit? You think your sadness over the loss of your dog was somehow solved by a wad of chemically-treated tobacco leaves? You honestly believe anyone, other than another dipper, finds the habit of cramming crap in your lip and spitting (or swallowing) brown droll to be “not disgusting?” Come on. No one who writes with the insight and clarity of your post below could possibly believe these things. It is your addicted mind talking, not your “inner monologue.”

But let me pay special attention to your comment that this is a $600.00 per year problem. You may, in fact, believe this, so I am burning some of my work time to enlighten you. Let’s leave aside the cost of tobacco itself, the extra medical expenses, the extra dental expenses from destroying your gum line and corroding your enamel, the insurance premiums (or lying which invalidates the coverage) or ruining clothing and carpeting with spilled dip cups, etc. Let’s even ignore the the sheer amount of time and energy and attention that we waste on tobacco ... you used some of that time to post questions here, so you know what I am talking about. It wears on you, and that too is a cost.

No, for the purpose of this discussion, let’s focus just on the one assurance stated on the packaging itself ... when used as directed, chewing tobacco causes cancer. Here is a cost you are not fully considering.

Like your father, my father also used tobacco. And like you and your father, I was very close to my father. He was the best man in my wedding. So around age 57, just after he finished getting kids through college and married off and ready to enjoy life, he was diagnosed with colon and liver cancer. We tend to think of chewing tobacco only in terms of oral cancer, as if the carcinogens stay in our mouth and out of the blood stream. His chemo treatment was just unconscionable, as it deformed and bloated his body and then destroyed his desire to live. He once told me chemo was like feeling sick for 23 hours in the hope of feeling good for one. You sometimes wish you would just die. It ultimately got to the point where the chemo treatment and pain killers destroyed his mind as well. He did not want to talk or couldn’t talk. He did not want anyone, as he was almost unrecognizable to friends and family. In the end, after months of ever-increasing doses of morphine, trying to manage the unmanageable pain, I buried my father, my best friend, my mentor for the life well lived, at 60 years old. You want to talk about money? You are paying for this addiction with your life, not your cash. Hell, I would have paid tens of thousands of dollars per year on his behalf!

Let me also address the points and questions that you raise. You see, even with this critical insight, I still chewed tobacco for a couple years after my father died, as I had every club in the bag when it came to excuses and rationalizations. They sounded a lot like yours ... I “needed” tobacco to do well in my job, to be “one of the guys,” to do yardwork or coach sports teams or have a beer or [fill in everything else here]. I thought it was just “who I am,” that I was completely hopeless, and that I was going to just live with this “one bad habit.” But my mind would not allow it. Something inside of me would not leave it alone, just like you. I feel like a junkie. I was allowing a product (chewing tobacco) to literally control my life, my work, my moods, my happiness, everything, like some parasite to my mind. I was a whiny, weak-minded coward, ceding my mental and emotional well-being to a wad of cancer-causing, chemically-treated, brown-droll-inducing tobacco leaves. It was pathetic. And for whatever reason, I was just sick of it. It was not the man I wanted to be. I wanted command and control of this vessel.

Miami, I do not want to mislead you, even in the slightest way, so I must tell you, after I quit, I was generally a crappy lawyer, and sports coach, and husband, and father. I was “not myself.” I was moody and angry and felt life was unfair. This period lasted like 8 whole weeks! Now, I am sure that, to you at age 20, this probably sounds like a really long time. But from my vantage point, now almost 15 years removed from a 20-year addiction, that is an absolutely laughable concept, just a really pathetic excuse/rationalization. What a ridiculously small price to pay to be my own man, to make my own weather, to free my mind from tobacco addiction.

And that, Miami, is why I am using my valuable work time to talk to you, an anonymous stranger struggling with tobacco addiction. I come by here every now and again, in the hope of seeing a post like yours, for three reasons:

1. it will always remain one of the greatest regrets of my life is that it took me 15 years to have the insight, intelligence, and courage to free my mind and quit this fucking moronic habit. I look back and just shake my head ... what in the world was I thinking? I cannot remember single one of those “good reasons” (like my dog dying or school being stressful or whatever).

2. Like Red in The Shaw Shank Redemption, I truly wish I could go back in time and talk to that 20-year-old me, just talk some sense into him, give him my knowledge and perspective and tools needed to free himself from tobacco addiction. Maybe even punch him in the nose. I don’t know. But I can’t. The only thing I can do is look for 20-year-old version of me, and give them was I needed, try to explain to them that it is so doable, so worthy of their effort, and so important to do it now. And today, that, my friend, is you.

3. I want you to know that this website contains all of the instructions, resources, compassion, and camaraderie that you will ever need to free yourself and your mind from tobacco addiction. I know this is true because, in November of 2001, I found this website. That is why I am here. I am repaying my debt to QS.org. If you use this website, invest in it, give yourself to the community,, celebrating your private victories, and support others in their struggles, you too will free your mind from tobacco addiction. There are great people here, ranging from Day 1 to Day 5,000, who are far more involved and vested than I am, and they will guide you on this journey of self-discovery and personal freedom.

And honestly, at this point, it is likely the only choice for you. You will never “unring the bell.” You now know the right thing to do. These words will ring inside of you, during your inner monologue, for the rest of time until you find the courage to type “Day 1” and mean it. My advice would be to do it now, right now. There is never a “good time” to quit chewing tobacco, and you are burning valuable days looking for it. The broader truth is that, through this process, you will learn to “make your own weather” and stop allowing the circumstances of your life to impair your judgment or dictate your behavior. You learn to be your own man, free of the fake and fatal influence of tobacco addiction, and the success and lessons here can spill over to other areas of your life. It did for me.

Good luck, Miami. You can free your mind, starting right now, with one simple, direct, unwavering commitment ... no tobacco today.

Bluesman

Edited by Bluesman
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I often try to put "pen to paper", and I come out with a turd mostly. Dammit man, that was some good stuff. Bravo, Bluesman.

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You nailed it for me with this sentence,

 

"I thought it was just who I am, that I was completely hopeless, and that I was going to just live with this one bad habit. But my mind would not allow it. Something inside of me would not leave it alone,"

 

After caving out of the July 2014 group, and the August, ... until finally leaving the December group, I promised myself I would never come back here again. I wasn't going to put myself through withdrawal again. Nor experience the embarrassment and frustration of trying and failing over and over again. I was a dipper. I would accept that and live well in spite of it. And anyway, the anguish I put myself through during my quit attempts messed with my life more than the actual dipping ever did. So I resigned from The December Contenders and felt a huge sense of relief to finally let go of the struggle and move on with my life

 

But it didn't work. As much as I wanted to make peace with dip, I couldn't. I went years and years dipping without even a thought to quit and now I couldn't get through a single day without feeling hounded by these voices inside. I realized that I couldn't live happily ever after with dip. As much as I wanted to, it wasn't happening.

 

And that knowledge is what brought me back to this site, swallowing my pride, looking the ordeal of quitting in the eye, and posting Day 1 again. And that's one of the reasons I posted NDT 8 times now and kept it. It's no longer a question of "Do I want a Dip?" Of course I do. Desperately sometimes. But the more realistic question for me is "Do I want to be a dipper?" And I know that I don't. Not anymore.

 

This site helped me realize that and helped me remember it through 7 miserable days of withdrawal. And if I can keep that for the rest of today and wake up tomorrow having earned the right to post a number 9 next to my name...then I figure I'll have something to be proud of and a lot to be thankful for.

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The bonds of nicotine are so strong that, in my 30s, I watched a grandfather and two uncles die from lung cancer and, in my late 40s, saw my strong father suffer a stroke from smoking most of his life that left him in a nursing home, paralyzed on his right side and unable to talk until his death 6 years later, yet continued to use a can of Copenhagen a day, knowing full well it was slowly killing me.

 

But 3,163 days ago, at age 54, I decided there would never be the right time to quit and began the journey back to freedom with total resolve that I would do whatever it takes, for as long as it takes, through whatever else is going on.

 

I began that journey just weeks into a new job that was more stressful than any I've ever had and through some difficult experiences that I won't bore you with. As stated by others, the first few days were hell and the triggers were unrelenting for months. I just wanted to be free more than feeding the nicotine slave master.

 

Freedom is worth the price of admission. That freedom is mine as long as I never believe the lie that I could ever again handle "just one".

 

 

 

.

Edited by Eutychus
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Just checking in after a few years.

 

I started dipping at about 22 and pretty much continued daily until I freaked out about a mouth lesion in 2009 at the age of 40. At the time I was up to about a half a can of Copenhagen per day, sometimes more. I loved dipping. Copenhagen was like my friend. Always there when I had a bad day, or a good day, or if I was just bored. It was my after dinner mint and accompanied all my beer outings. I never would have been motivated to quit if I had not become concerned about my health.

 

The mouth sore turned out to be nothing but served as my impetus to put it down. That is when I discovered this website. Although I never posted much I perused this site often in the beginning as I found the testimonies both informative and familiar. I never did take another dip although I did smoke a few cigarettes while out drinking in early 2010. I woke up the next day sick as a dog. That was the last time I ever had nicotine.

 

I just wanted to say, if I can do it so can you. Copenhagen is just a distant memory now, which is the greatest thing about quitting for me. I never truly understood before how addicted I was until one day I realized that I no longer thought about snuff anymore. There was I time when it would be the first thing in the morning and the last thing before bed.

 

Freedom from addiction is worth it! And this site and its contributors helped me in ways that they never knew.

 

God speed.

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I'm powerless over dip.

Last dip I had was 24 hours ago. Started in 1992 as a first year teacher in Appalachia. My coaching friends all chewed - that's why I started.

I can list all the reasons to quit - lesions, gum recession, wife hates it, students asking me about it, money, etc. But it comes down to this - this poison controls a lot of what I do during the day. Sneaking in the bathroom to put a dip in. Using my deodorant to cover up the smell on my fingers. Nicotine owns me. No more. My dad and grandpa both quit - now its my turn. I've battled some cravings today. No headaches or anxiety stuff yet but I suspect its coming.

Edited by Tigerhawk

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I'm powerless over dip.

Last dip I had was 24 hours ago. Started in 1992 as a first year teacher in Appalachia. My coaching friends all chewed - that's why I started.

I can list all the reasons to quit - lesions, gum recession, wife hates it, students asking me about it, money, etc. But it comes down to this - this poison controls a lot of what I do during the day. Sneaking in the bathroom to put a dip in. Using my deodorant to cover up the smell on my fingers. Nicotine owns me. No more. My dad and grandpa both quit - now its my turn. I've battled some cravings today. No headaches or anxiety stuff yet but I suspect its coming.

Stay Strong Tigerhawk. It seems to me you have more power than you think over Dip... Good job so far. Stay strong and no dipping!

 

Didn't see you post roll in the newest quit group. You should do it. Sure has helped me. Just having a place to blow off all if the quitting steam!!!!!! Good Luck!

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I'm powerless over dip.Last dip I had was 24 hours ago. Started in 1992 as a first year teacher in Appalachia. My coaching friends all chewed - that's why I started.I can list all the reasons to quit - lesions, gum recession, wife hates it, students asking me about it, money, etc. But it comes down to this - this poison controls a lot of what I do during the day. Sneaking in the bathroom to put a dip in. Using my deodorant to cover up the smell on my fingers. Nicotine owns me. No more. My dad and grandpa both quit - now its my turn. I've battled some cravings today. No headaches or anxiety stuff yet but I suspect its coming.

Stay Strong Tigerhawk. It seems to me you have more power than you think over Dip... Good job so far. Stay strong and no dipping!Didn't see you post roll in the newest quit group. You should do it. Sure has helped me. Just having a place to blow off all if the quitting steam!!!!!! Good Luck!

Thanks man. Finding that this site helps. Lots of gum and candy. Going to do those activities today where I never chewed before - namely spending some extra time at gym. No headaches yet, just bad cravings, some irritability.

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I put nearly 1,000 miles on my Harley this weekend and less than two hours from home is where my story begins. Do not worry, this is not a cave story. I pulled in for fuel and was looking for something to throw in my mouth while driving. I was about to buy gum when I saw the SMC (smoky mountain chew – ie: fake dip). I thought I would try it. It has no nicotine and maybe throwing in a dip while riding my geezer glide down a lonely stretch of road would feel pretty good. I did the familiar edge of my tooth as a can opener trick to break the seal and threw a leg over. I piled in a big fatty and hit the road. I expected waves of nostalgia as I had the thrust out lip, the increased saliva and the slightly bitter taste in my mouth. Instead, I was transported in my mind to a time I have long since moved past. It flooded me with memories of anger and resentment. Of tears when I felt too weak to stay quit. Of the depression that took hold when I would not own my own quit and wanted to blame others for my misery. I got no joy from “playing house” with fake dip. I got sadness for years and money I threw away. Why would I give positive memories to something that only took from me, never gave back? It did one thing for me. It reminded me so strongly of how far I have come. I took nearly two years to actually feel like a former dipper. I fought daily for well over a year and honestly close to two. I wanted to give up but I did not want to be weak. I do not remember when I finally stopped blaming others and decided this was all about me, but I know it happened. I went through the darkest time in my marriage then. I lost friends and hated the medication I was on. I am done with this.
Five miles down the road I formed my finger into the familiar hook shape – it’s amazing how muscle memory comes rushing back – and flung the lip turd down the highway. I reached in my pocket and winged that retched tin down the road as well. Not exactly ethical disposal, but I needed it gone. Riding is about freedom. I felt free as I pondered my experience will spitting little bits of crap out that my tongue pulled out of my teeth. I leaned back, set the cruise and enjoyed the rest of my ride home as a free man. I probably couldn’t afford my Harley if I was still dipping. Dip would cost more than my loan payment and insurance combined now. I’m much happier calling myself a biker than a dipper. Live free or die brothers and sisters. No dip for me today, not ever.

 

Tamado - day 3,003 (Sept 2007)

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Make no mistake what Curt Schilling Tweeted today was idiotic. However, what he is doing to try to break the link between baseball and dip is commendable. Also, in case you missed it, here's his pretty powerful "Letter to himself". I'm sure we could all write some good ones...
http://www.theplayerstribune.com/curt-schilling-letter-to-my-younger-self/

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I want to live. I don't want to die from mouth cancer.

Edited by FightBack

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After reading Curt Schilling's "Letter to My Younger Self" I propose that this would be a good section for this site. I think there should be a Letter's to a Younger Self section in the Welcome Center on the site. If you could, what would you say to yourself when you first pinched that dip between your fingers? I know what I would say to myself before that first dip lead to 24 years of dipping. I bet it would be similar to what you all would say. Just my two cents but i think it is a grand idea.

 

Sweet Tony - 1,823

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Credit for this goes to Spongebob Mantra. I like reading it every now and then to make sure my priorities are still in the right place.

There is only one thing that I must accomplish today, and that is to not chew.
If I get other things done today, great.
But everything else has second priority for now.
Soon I'll be able to focus on those other things too.
But for right now, for today, this is the only thing that matters.
I won't demand more of myself, and I won't get down on myself for not doing anything else if I don't get to it.
This is damn damn damn hard work, and it's the most important work that I have right now.
I'll be truly and sincerely proud if I meet no goals today other than keeping that crap out of my mouth.

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Just thought I'd check in today. It's been a long since I've been on the site. But some of you older quitters may remember me and the newer members have only heard rumors of the legendary quitter, Killerattorney....haha! Anyway, today marks my 9th quit anniversary. This site is a lifesaver. Use it, use the resources provided, use each other for support, and work hard to stay quit, my friends. Don't let anything convince you that you can't stay quit. If I can, so can you. It wasn't easy. But at some point you realize that life is better without tobacco and that you can get through the day, the week, the month, without it. It's an addictive drug, but it's not like oxygen...you CAN live without it. In fact, you will thrive without it. Have a good day, everyone. I'm on the Facebook QS page if you ever want to catch me. Though we all have to quit for ourselves, this site will make it much less difficult if you use it the correct way.

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I got to looking around this site after being away for a long, long time. It's been over 8 years since I quit, and I'm still quit. I'm going to repost an article I wrote way way back in the day. The dates aren't correct anymore, but the message is sound (I think anyway :whistle: ) Stay Quit my friends.

 

--------------------------

 

"What's Your Quit Worth?"


I know a lot of you are looking at the title and figuring this all about the $$$. Although that's a nice bonus to quitting, it's not the purpose of this article. I mean it in a deeper sense. What does it mean to you, really?

For the past two months, the dreaded nic bitch has been riding my shoulder, whispering in my ear trying to get me back. It's as though all the hard work and times haven't been worth that constant nagging. I look at where my life is right now ... on high blood pressure meds and about 20 pounds heavier than I was on dip ... and I wonder if listening to the bitch would be the right thing.

Temptation? Sure.

A lost cause? Giving up? Not hardly.

You see, I've gotten past too many things in my quit to back track now. Taking that dip means letting down a lot of people on this site, as well as those I actually know in real life. It also means failure. While failure isn't fatal for most things, who's to say I'd be able to quit a second time?

A struggle? Sure at times.

Looking back, I never thought I'd ever make it this far and yes, dipping thoughts still go through my mind at least twice a day for it is football season and the stress of coaching is still the same, dip or no dip. I am still using SMC to cope with the loss which is probably not helping my craving to go back, but it does help when around other coaches with the real thing.

Do I still have a ways to go? Absol f'n lutely.

I don't know who is more proud of my quit... me or those who knew I dipped for over 20 years. My wife has only gotten one year of me away from tobacco in our 13 married years and 18 years together. Throwing that away for a bitch who only wants to use me can't be worth it.

Thinking about quitting and don't think you can?

Yeah, I was there too. I used chew for over 22 years and privately envied those who didn't use it. I never thought I'd ever be one of them. Now I am, and I don't miss the slavery to having a dip every 3-4 hours.

Make the commitment and just tell yourself two very important things.

First, I don't do that anymore.
Second, a can of shit won't change anything.

Life throws you a lot twists and turns. How you handle them says a lot about who you are. Chew doesn't define or own me anymore, and it certainly can't make those twists or turns go away.

For those who don't know me, I'm currently on day 434 which is 433 days more than I ever thought possible and I've survived a trip to an oral surgeon to check my mouth for cancer which my dentist referred me. This question has been nagging at me to get my thoughts down and I figured I'd pose the question here.

So I pose the question to you again. What's YOUR quit worth?

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Hey,

 

Have been a smokeless tobacco user for almost 20 yrs now. I am 34, have an amazing wife, 1 son, and one on the way. I have tried to quite many times before, but have always started back. Recently I started googling ways to quite. I am fed up with the habit and my lack of discipline over this issue. Came across this site and figured what the heck. Any advice for how to plug in? Side note...while creating username it asked for quit date. I haven't, so I put a future date just to be able to create user information.

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Hey,

 

Have been a smokeless tobacco user for almost 20 yrs now. I am 34, have an amazing wife, 1 son, and one on the way. I have tried to quite many times before, but have always started back. Recently I started googling ways to quite. I am fed up with the habit and my lack of discipline over this issue. Came across this site and figured what the heck. Any advice for how to plug in? Side note...while creating username it asked for quit date. I haven't, so I put a future date just to be able to create user information.

Welcome bflem. My suggestion to you would be to read as much as you can on here. There is a ton of info on this site. Every emotion you can imagine, every crave you can think of, has been played out by someone here. So we can help.

 

Oh yeah....you need to quit. Why not now?

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Thanks for the response Tiger Refuge. I was up late last night reading on this site. How does one plug in to a quit group as describe on this site? I assume you quit first?

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