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Flavius Victor

The Cafe - 2008

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Also, I'm sure you are one badass because you own a semi-automatic and know how to shoot it. That's the only defense you have.

Ok, you just committed the most serious error of all with that statement. That, my dear troll, is a fully automatic Thompson (and by the way, it is not the only defense I have.)

 

Eb, please don't go away mad, just go away!

Copper isn't a badass because of any guns he may or may not own. He is a badass because he is on day 83 with no tobacco.

 

But since Willy/Notgod/Ebenezer never really tries to quit using smokeless tobacco and only comes here to mess with others who are sincere about their quits, he is not a badass....he's just an ass.

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Just passed the half a hundred mark and realizing I've got to get the eating under control if I plan on getting thru the door by day 100. Think I've been taking the spongebob mantra too far - too long.

Gimmie some ideas.


  1.  

When did you start to worry about putting on pounds?

 

What did you do to get pounds off?

 

I've used the "I would rather dip than be fat" cave excuse before and will not fall for that mind F*** again.

You have to decide if your ready to take on that challenge, some have said that waited until they had better control over the Nic addiction.

As for losing weight, there are hundreds of things out there, but the truth is, and I am not under control either, that it is just like getting off the tobacco, you must have a lifestyle change. DIET and EXERCISE must change for the better.

 

Now if I can figure out how to better practice what I preach!

 

I was worried about the same thing. First step I took was to plan out my meals and no eating out except for once on weekends. Take that step first and then work some exercise in. Most important part is the diet.

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I'm still waiting for ebenezer/notgod/willy to give me his address so I can join him. Remember, I will need the distance in feet from your doorstep to the nearest intersection for the search warrant so I can find your house. I can't wait, we are going to have a blast! (flashbang)

 

 

I LOLd

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Just passed the half a hundred mark and realizing I've got to get the eating under control if I plan on getting thru the door by day 100. Think I've been taking the spongebob mantra too far - too long.

Gimmie some ideas.


  1.  

When did you start to worry about putting on pounds?

 

What did you do to get pounds off?

 

I've used the "I would rather dip than be fat" cave excuse before and will not fall for that mind F*** again.

You have to decide if your ready to take on that challenge, some have said that waited until they had better control over the Nic addiction.

As for losing weight, there are hundreds of things out there, but the truth is, and I am not under control either, that it is just like getting off the tobacco, you must have a lifestyle change. DIET and EXERCISE must change for the better.

 

Now if I can figure out how to better practice what I preach!

 

I was worried about the same thing. First step I took was to plan out my meals and no eating out except for once on weekends. Take that step first and then work some exercise in. Most important part is the diet.

 

I am day 19 and I am shoving so much food in my face that it makes me sick. I just walk around work full all day. I keep telling myself that I will start exercising as soon as I get my quit under control, but I am quickly realizing that I need to start hitting the treadmill immediately. Metabolism comes to a halt when the nicotine leaves the body. So even if we eat normal amounts of food the weight will continue to pile on. Working out is the only answer.

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Take a moment to realize what you are doing....for most of us - quitting is the most DIFFICULT thing we have ever done! We need to give our QUIT the attention it deserves for a few weeks. We may even hit a month or 2 before we start to feel better. This is an addction that gives us the impression it will be over with in a few moments. Maybe a couple of day....It is a struggle we will deal with for many days following this....days or months in the future.

 

We have an amazing community here to HELP each other battle our addictions. We have POSITIVE things to say...and we are ready to jump at any pleas that are thrown at us. We will do what we can to help you through any "rough" times you may encounter.

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Just passed the half a hundred mark and realizing I've got to get the eating under control if I plan on getting thru the door by day 100. Think I've been taking the spongebob mantra too far - too long.

Gimmie some ideas.


  1.  

When did you start to worry about putting on pounds?

 

What did you do to get pounds off?

 

I've used the "I would rather dip than be fat" cave excuse before and will not fall for that mind F*** again.

You have to decide if your ready to take on that challenge, some have said that waited until they had better control over the Nic addiction.

As for losing weight, there are hundreds of things out there, but the truth is, and I am not under control either, that it is just like getting off the tobacco, you must have a lifestyle change. DIET and EXERCISE must change for the better.

 

Now if I can figure out how to better practice what I preach!

 

I was worried about the same thing. First step I took was to plan out my meals and no eating out except for once on weekends. Take that step first and then work some exercise in. Most important part is the diet.

 

I am day 19 and I am shoving so much food in my face that it makes me sick. I just walk around work full all day. I keep telling myself that I will start exercising as soon as I get my quit under control, but I am quickly realizing that I need to start hitting the treadmill immediately. Metabolism comes to a halt when the nicotine leaves the body. So even if we eat normal amounts of food the weight will continue to pile on. Working out is the only answer.

 

I worried about the pounds after my HOF date!

I started a goal to cut back my food intake, I counted calories, and I am still counting and cutting back. I eat better food, no sugar soda or tea (one diet a week) I take vitamins from GNC and Mega Green Tea pill to help get this metabolism is check. I work out 5 - 6 days a week, it sucks, but I do it. I even have a bad foot right now, but I push through it. I drink lots of water about 140 -170oz a day. If you do not work out, cut that to about 120 or so. I am focused and it is my new addiction. If I do not follow it, then I fail, and I WILL NOT FAIL!!

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Just passed the half a hundred mark and realizing I've got to get the eating under control if I plan on getting thru the door by day 100. Think I've been taking the spongebob mantra too far - too long.

Gimmie some ideas.


  1.  

When did you start to worry about putting on pounds?

 

What did you do to get pounds off?

 

I've used the "I would rather dip than be fat" cave excuse before and will not fall for that mind F*** again.

 

 

When eating meals, eat as slow as possible. This will give you the feeling of being full with less quantity.

soccerplyrNcoach is on the money with the water. Your liver will help your kidneys filter fluids if it needs to. However, it is your liver that breaks down fat. Your kidneys work efficiently when your body has plenty of water, thus leaving your liver to do other things, like breaking down fat cells.

 

I put on about ten pounds by day fifty and I have taken off only half at this point. If I can stay at this weight for now, I'll use the summer heat to burn off the rest and maybe a few more. But for now, the quit is more important and if eating makes me feel better, then for now, so be it.

 

Oh, one last tip. Animal Crackers. Big bags at Walmart are a buck seventy. They are low cal, low fat, and frankly I love 'em. Good snack to calm the hunger.

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Just passed the half a hundred mark and realizing I've got to get the eating under control if I plan on getting thru the door by day 100. Think I've been taking the spongebob mantra too far - too long.

Gimmie some ideas.


  1.  

When did you start to worry about putting on pounds?

 

What did you do to get pounds off?

 

I've used the "I would rather dip than be fat" cave excuse before and will not fall for that mind F*** again.

You have to decide if your ready to take on that challenge, some have said that waited until they had better control over the Nic addiction.

As for losing weight, there are hundreds of things out there, but the truth is, and I am not under control either, that it is just like getting off the tobacco, you must have a lifestyle change. DIET and EXERCISE must change for the better.

 

Now if I can figure out how to better practice what I preach!

 

I was worried about the same thing. First step I took was to plan out my meals and no eating out except for once on weekends. Take that step first and then work some exercise in. Most important part is the diet.

 

I am day 19 and I am shoving so much food in my face that it makes me sick. I just walk around work full all day. I keep telling myself that I will start exercising as soon as I get my quit under control, but I am quickly realizing that I need to start hitting the treadmill immediately. Metabolism comes to a halt when the nicotine leaves the body. So even if we eat normal amounts of food the weight will continue to pile on. Working out is the only answer.

 

 

Farley- not only will the tread mill help the pounds, it will also help keep you even during this hard time in your life. I took up running early on in my quit- Now, at 217, I have a new addiction- RUNNING. And, it is good for you... It really helps me with the stress of my quit and my life.

 

Enjoy and do not hesitate to join in on the "running" section of "Health and Fitness". We would love to have you stop on by.

 

Enjoy your evening and you "Rock" for being quit of NICOTINE.... Keep it up my brother.

 

JJ1

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simbo234 & bizzy & farley

Good to see you’re all doing well and thinking about the pounds and not the dip. That I a great sign! Somewhere on this forum is a sidebar discussion of health/exercise – check it out. Lots of ways to shed the pounds without dip. For what it’s worth, exercise will replace the feel good chemical that dip caused your body to release, so it’s a great thing to do. I’m sure someone here can enlighten you on the scientifical explanation

willyIIII0o I believe that you want to quit, but this site relies somewhat on the member having a sense of pride and at least some self-respect. When you come here and announce that you are quitting you’re calling yourself out in front of everyone here. It doesn’t seem that you’re able to man up. Maybe you should think about rehab. This doesn’t seem to be working out for you.

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Just passed the half a hundred mark and realizing I've got to get the eating under control if I plan on getting thru the door by day 100. Think I've been taking the spongebob mantra too far - too long.

Gimmie some ideas.


  1.  

When did you start to worry about putting on pounds?

 

What did you do to get pounds off?

 

I've used the "I would rather dip than be fat" cave excuse before and will not fall for that mind F*** again.

You have to decide if your ready to take on that challenge, some have said that waited until they had better control over the Nic addiction.

As for losing weight, there are hundreds of things out there, but the truth is, and I am not under control either, that it is just like getting off the tobacco, you must have a lifestyle change. DIET and EXERCISE must change for the better.

 

Now if I can figure out how to better practice what I preach!

 

I was worried about the same thing. First step I took was to plan out my meals and no eating out except for once on weekends. Take that step first and then work some exercise in. Most important part is the diet.

 

I am day 19 and I am shoving so much food in my face that it makes me sick. I just walk around work full all day. I keep telling myself that I will start exercising as soon as I get my quit under control, but I am quickly realizing that I need to start hitting the treadmill immediately. Metabolism comes to a halt when the nicotine leaves the body. So even if we eat normal amounts of food the weight will continue to pile on. Working out is the only answer.

 

 

Farley- not only will the tread mill help the pounds, it will also help keep you even during this hard time in your life. I took up running early on in my quit- Now, at 217, I have a new addiction- RUNNING. And, it is good for you... It really helps me with the stress of my quit and my life.

 

Enjoy and do not hesitate to join in on the "running" section of "Health and Fitness". We would love to have you stop on by.

 

Enjoy your evening and you "Rock" for being quit of NICOTINE.... Keep it up my brother.

 

JJ1

 

Thanks, I am going to start hitting the gym next week. I can't take my stomach bulging out anymore. Plus, the stress of week three is killing me so I can't wait to get in some killer stress relieving workouts. I use to be a runner a long time ago, and I can't wait to get that runner's high again. I'll join the running section after I actually start working out, thanks for the invite, and the support.

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...

do you ever run out of ammo??

 

I hope not, I brought a lot to this war, I knew it would be an intense battle, so I came prepared. If I do run out of ammo, I have some grenades attached to my belt so I'll use them.

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Just passed the half a hundred mark and realizing I've got to get the eating under control if I plan on getting thru the door by day 100. Think I've been taking the spongebob mantra too far - too long.

Gimmie some ideas.


  1.  

When did you start to worry about putting on pounds?

 

What did you do to get pounds off?

 

I've used the "I would rather dip than be fat" cave excuse before and will not fall for that mind F*** again.

You have to decide if your ready to take on that challenge, some have said that waited until they had better control over the Nic addiction.

As for losing weight, there are hundreds of things out there, but the truth is, and I am not under control either, that it is just like getting off the tobacco, you must have a lifestyle change. DIET and EXERCISE must change for the better.

 

Now if I can figure out how to better practice what I preach!

 

I was worried about the same thing. First step I took was to plan out my meals and no eating out except for once on weekends. Take that step first and then work some exercise in. Most important part is the diet.

 

I am day 19 and I am shoving so much food in my face that it makes me sick. I just walk around work full all day. I keep telling myself that I will start exercising as soon as I get my quit under control, but I am quickly realizing that I need to start hitting the treadmill immediately. Metabolism comes to a halt when the nicotine leaves the body. So even if we eat normal amounts of food the weight will continue to pile on. Working out is the only answer.

 

 

Farley- not only will the tread mill help the pounds, it will also help keep you even during this hard time in your life. I took up running early on in my quit- Now, at 217, I have a new addiction- RUNNING. And, it is good for you... It really helps me with the stress of my quit and my life.

 

Enjoy and do not hesitate to join in on the "running" section of "Health and Fitness". We would love to have you stop on by.

 

Enjoy your evening and you "Rock" for being quit of NICOTINE.... Keep it up my brother.

 

JJ1

 

Thanks, I am going to start hitting the gym next week. I can't take my stomach bulging out anymore. Plus, the stress of week three is killing me so I can't wait to get in some killer stress relieving workouts. I use to be a runner a long time ago, and I can't wait to get that runner's high again. I'll join the running section after I actually start working out, thanks for the invite, and the support.

 

 

 

 

 

after 49 days i have gained a few pounds about 10 oh well to me not chewing that s it is MUCH more important than a few pounds i figure if i can stop chewing after 25 years in a few weeks i can start to watch my weight think about it what is a harder quit stop chewing or eating better no brainer if we can STOP chewing i know we can control our food intake Stop chewing is our number 1 goal the weight we can deal with later so that is my 2 pounds (2 cents worth) Guy

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Just passed the half a hundred mark and realizing I've got to get the eating under control if I plan on getting thru the door by day 100. Think I've been taking the spongebob mantra too far - too long.

Gimmie some ideas.


  1.  

When did you start to worry about putting on pounds?

 

What did you do to get pounds off?

 

I've used the "I would rather dip than be fat" cave excuse before and will not fall for that mind F*** again.

You have to decide if your ready to take on that challenge, some have said that waited until they had better control over the Nic addiction.

As for losing weight, there are hundreds of things out there, but the truth is, and I am not under control either, that it is just like getting off the tobacco, you must have a lifestyle change. DIET and EXERCISE must change for the better.

 

Now if I can figure out how to better practice what I preach!

 

I was worried about the same thing. First step I took was to plan out my meals and no eating out except for once on weekends. Take that step first and then work some exercise in. Most important part is the diet.

 

I am day 19 and I am shoving so much food in my face that it makes me sick. I just walk around work full all day. I keep telling myself that I will start exercising as soon as I get my quit under control, but I am quickly realizing that I need to start hitting the treadmill immediately. Metabolism comes to a halt when the nicotine leaves the body. So even if we eat normal amounts of food the weight will continue to pile on. Working out is the only answer.

 

 

Farley- not only will the tread mill help the pounds, it will also help keep you even during this hard time in your life. I took up running early on in my quit- Now, at 217, I have a new addiction- RUNNING. And, it is good for you... It really helps me with the stress of my quit and my life.

 

Enjoy and do not hesitate to join in on the "running" section of "Health and Fitness". We would love to have you stop on by.

 

Enjoy your evening and you "Rock" for being quit of NICOTINE.... Keep it up my brother.

 

JJ1

 

Thanks, I am going to start hitting the gym next week. I can't take my stomach bulging out anymore. Plus, the stress of week three is killing me so I can't wait to get in some killer stress relieving workouts. I use to be a runner a long time ago, and I can't wait to get that runner's high again. I'll join the running section after I actually start working out, thanks for the invite, and the support.

 

 

after 49 days i have gained a few pounds about 10 oh well to me not chewing that s it is MUCH more important than a few pounds i figure if i can stop chewing after 25 years in a few weeks i can start to watch my weight think about it what is a harder quit stop chewing or eating better no brainer if we can STOP chewing i know we can control our food intake Stop chewing is our number 1 goal the weight we can deal with later so that is my 2 pounds (2 cents worth) Guy

 

Week 3, oh I remember the days. Ya know even though you have passed the addiction phase, some of those weeks before 100 days can have their moments. I experienced significant "funks" between 20 and 30 and around50-70 days. I'm convinced that the early ones were related to the extreme training program that I had put myself through for the previous 21 years. I was a master ninja dipper. Think about. I would spend all of my waking hours planning my days around my dips. "The name is Bond....James Bond."

How can I slip away from this, how can I make an excuse to get out, where are the kids now, ooohhh, they're going over to the neighbors at 4 PM, yes, oh, the boss needs something from town. I can volunteer...etc.

So when I quit, after I made it through the dependency phase, I started feeling like I wasn't doing anything. So much of my day was occupied around planning and strategizing my habit, that I felt my life was empty. I don't know if this will feel the same for everyone, but be prepared. Many members get these funks. I'm at 174 days now, and I don't crave, and I have very little if any funks. They get further and further apart, and shorter and shorter in time span.

"And use the tools of this site. Call your fellow HOF members in advance. Get to know them. Read, educate and decide. No one has ever said they were glad they caved."

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Week 3, oh I remember the days. Ya know even though you have passed the addiction phase, some of those weeks before 100 days can have their moments. I experienced significant "funks" between 20 and 30 and around50-70 days. I'm convinced that the early ones were related to the extreme training program that I had put myself through for the previous 21 years. I was a master ninja dipper. Think about. I would spend all of my waking hours planning my days around my dips. "The name is Bond....James Bond."

How can I slip away from this, how can I make an excuse to get out, where are the kids now, ooohhh, they're going over to the neighbors at 4 PM, yes, oh, the boss needs something from town. I can volunteer...etc.

So when I quit, after I made it through the dependency phase, I started feeling like I wasn't doing anything. So much of my day was occupied around planning and strategizing my habit, that I felt my life was empty. I don't know if this will feel the same for everyone, but be prepared. Many members get these funks. I'm at 174 days now, and I don't crave, and I have very little if any funks. They get further and further apart, and shorter and shorter in time span.

 

Isn't it amazing how much you planned around dipping & thought about it without ever realizing you were doing it? I was a ninja dipper too & I know exactly what you're talking about. If I ever feel like I'm not doing anything or get a little down about now having one, I try to think about the freedom I've gained from quitting. That is nice & well worth a little temporary uneasiness.

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Week 3, oh I remember the days. Ya know even though you have passed the addiction phase, some of those weeks before 100 days can have their moments. I experienced significant "funks" between 20 and 30 and around50-70 days. I'm convinced that the early ones were related to the extreme training program that I had put myself through for the previous 21 years. I was a master ninja dipper. Think about. I would spend all of my waking hours planning my days around my dips. "The name is Bond....James Bond."

How can I slip away from this, how can I make an excuse to get out, where are the kids now, ooohhh, they're going over to the neighbors at 4 PM, yes, oh, the boss needs something from town. I can volunteer...etc.

So when I quit, after I made it through the dependency phase, I started feeling like I wasn't doing anything. So much of my day was occupied around planning and strategizing my habit, that I felt my life was empty. I don't know if this will feel the same for everyone, but be prepared. Many members get these funks. I'm at 174 days now, and I don't crave, and I have very little if any funks. They get further and further apart, and shorter and shorter in time span.

 

Isn't it amazing how much you planned around dipping & thought about it without ever realizing you were doing it? I was a ninja dipper too & I know exactly what you're talking about. If I ever feel like I'm not doing anything or get a little down about now having one, I try to think about the freedom I've gained from quitting. That is nice & well worth a little temporary uneasiness.

Many of us "ninja dippers" (those who hid their addiction from family, friends, or loved ones) can relate. I just wonder how much stress I put on my heart each time I would buy my poison in the store and have to look around to make sure no one that knew me and my wife (now "ex") would see me and tell her what I was buying. Or how I would worry that she might stop by my office unannounced while I had a dip in and catch me in my lie. I even remember running at night with a dip in (best way to get my last dose of the drug before bedtime) one time and a client called with an emergency. My wife drove and found me running to tell me about it and told me to get in the car and she'd drive me home. Of course, I insisted on running the rest of the way home, because I didn't want her to notice that I had a dip in. What a fool I was back then. This addiction makes people do stupid things. But not anymore....566 days without tobacco, and now I don't stress out when I'm in line at the store, my office door is open to all, and I can enjoy my running without looking over my shoulder!

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Week 3, oh I remember the days. Ya know even though you have passed the addiction phase, some of those weeks before 100 days can have their moments. I experienced significant "funks" between 20 and 30 and around50-70 days. I'm convinced that the early ones were related to the extreme training program that I had put myself through for the previous 21 years. I was a master ninja dipper. Think about. I would spend all of my waking hours planning my days around my dips. "The name is Bond....James Bond."

How can I slip away from this, how can I make an excuse to get out, where are the kids now, ooohhh, they're going over to the neighbors at 4 PM, yes, oh, the boss needs something from town. I can volunteer...etc.

So when I quit, after I made it through the dependency phase, I started feeling like I wasn't doing anything. So much of my day was occupied around planning and strategizing my habit, that I felt my life was empty. I don't know if this will feel the same for everyone, but be prepared. Many members get these funks. I'm at 174 days now, and I don't crave, and I have very little if any funks. They get further and further apart, and shorter and shorter in time span.

 

Isn't it amazing how much you planned around dipping & thought about it without ever realizing you were doing it? I was a ninja dipper too & I know exactly what you're talking about. If I ever feel like I'm not doing anything or get a little down about now having one, I try to think about the freedom I've gained from quitting. That is nice & well worth a little temporary uneasiness.

Many of us "ninja dippers" (those who hid their addiction from family, friends, or loved ones) can relate. I just wonder how much stress I put on my heart each time I would buy my poison in the store and have to look around to make sure no one that knew me and my wife (now "ex") would see me and tell her what I was buying. Or how I would worry that she might stop by my office unannounced while I had a dip in and catch me in my lie. I even remember running at night with a dip in (best way to get my last dose of the drug before bedtime) one time and a client called with an emergency. My wife drove and found me running to tell me about it and told me to get in the car and she'd drive me home. Of course, I insisted on running the rest of the way home, because I didn't want her to notice that I had a dip in. What a fool I was back then. This addiction makes people do stupid things. But not anymore....566 days without tobacco, and now I don't stress out when I'm in line at the store, my office door is open to all, and I can enjoy my running without looking over my shoulder!

I was talking with some people this week that are working toward a quit date for cigarettes. They are using two weeks to deal with triggers - spending time doing certain things they usually do smoking. It really sank in that I used to dip during almost everything I did from waking until bedtime except eating or sitting in the dentist's chair. When most of us quit, our whole life was a trigger.

 

-Euty, Day 597 nicotine-free

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Just passed the half a hundred mark and realizing I've got to get the eating under control if I plan on getting thru the door by day 100. Think I've been taking the spongebob mantra too far - too long.

Gimmie some ideas.


  1.  

When did you start to worry about putting on pounds?

 

What did you do to get pounds off?

 

I've used the "I would rather dip than be fat" cave excuse before and will not fall for that mind F*** again.

You have to decide if your ready to take on that challenge, some have said that waited until they had better control over the Nic addiction.

As for losing weight, there are hundreds of things out there, but the truth is, and I am not under control either, that it is just like getting off the tobacco, you must have a lifestyle change. DIET and EXERCISE must change for the better.

 

Now if I can figure out how to better practice what I preach!

 

I was worried about the same thing. First step I took was to plan out my meals and no eating out except for once on weekends. Take that step first and then work some exercise in. Most important part is the diet.

 

I am day 19 and I am shoving so much food in my face that it makes me sick. I just walk around work full all day. I keep telling myself that I will start exercising as soon as I get my quit under control, but I am quickly realizing that I need to start hitting the treadmill immediately. Metabolism comes to a halt when the nicotine leaves the body. So even if we eat normal amounts of food the weight will continue to pile on. Working out is the only answer.

 

 

Farley- not only will the tread mill help the pounds, it will also help keep you even during this hard time in your life. I took up running early on in my quit- Now, at 217, I have a new addiction- RUNNING. And, it is good for you... It really helps me with the stress of my quit and my life.

 

Enjoy and do not hesitate to join in on the "running" section of "Health and Fitness". We would love to have you stop on by.

 

Enjoy your evening and you "Rock" for being quit of NICOTINE.... Keep it up my brother.

 

JJ1

 

Thanks, I am going to start hitting the gym next week. I can't take my stomach bulging out anymore. Plus, the stress of week three is killing me so I can't wait to get in some killer stress relieving workouts. I use to be a runner a long time ago, and I can't wait to get that runner's high again. I'll join the running section after I actually start working out, thanks for the invite, and the support.

 

 

 

 

 

after 49 days i have gained a few pounds about 10 oh well to me not chewing that s it is MUCH more important than a few pounds i figure if i can stop chewing after 25 years in a few weeks i can start to watch my weight think about it what is a harder quit stop chewing or eating better no brainer if we can STOP chewing i know we can control our food intake Stop chewing is our number 1 goal the weight we can deal with later so that is my 2 pounds (2 cents worth) Guy

the run-on sentence is a commonly used literary device in some cases going so far as to take up very large spaces the amount of a whole paragraph continuing on for a very long while without any sign of a exclamation point question mark or even a simple period to close it off and begin a new sentence usually containing a large mass of commas and occasionally semicolons in their places and going very far on beyond any point of real usefulness and then some continuing much further than needed which is like this entire introductory paragraph for the reason that there are no full stops (known as periods to some people) in this entire sentence this being of course for the sole purpose of making this sentence long enough to be in extremely bad taste and seem like it is never going to end which of course is almost true because even though this sentence has not stopped yet it is very likely to stop in the future for even a run-on sentence such as this one is not very likely to have an infinite number of words although it can have such a large amount of words that nobody in their right mind would actually want to read the entire thing unless they found it comical or interesting for the simple reason that it is very very long long enough in fact to take up the entire page when written in a reasonably large font its length being its sole claim to fame for the reason that sentences do not normally go on to such a length while run-on sentences can be as long as this one or even longer without any sign of stopping and in complete absence of the kind of punctuation that would usually end every sentence because one of the most fundamental rules of proper sentence structure namely that sentences have to be of a reasonable length and have a coherent structure is being completely ignored in run-on sentences which is the reason why most teachers forbid run-on sentences in essays and papers as they are disruptive and confusing and even a single run-on sentence can be so long as to make the essay much longer than it would normally be without adding any content because almost all run-on sentences lose focus after a point and just become a sequence of random ramblings which because they lack proper termination can last for a very long period of time but as said above all run-on sentences must eventually end because they cannot have an infinite number of words though the longer they get the less effort needs to be put into them and at this point i could probably say anything i want and nobody in their right mind would actually read far enough to tell that i am getting completely off topic and should probably stop now but i won't the reason being that this being a run-on sentence it is not entirely necessary for me to be on topic or even remotely related to whatever i said to begin with a run-on sentence in its entirety can be one insanely long piece of workhowever usually they are created by mistakes by some student who understands nothing of the beauty of the english language and its grammatical tenets

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Week 3, oh I remember the days. Ya know even though you have passed the addiction phase, some of those weeks before 100 days can have their moments. I experienced significant "funks" between 20 and 30 and around50-70 days. I'm convinced that the early ones were related to the extreme training program that I had put myself through for the previous 21 years. I was a master ninja dipper. Think about. I would spend all of my waking hours planning my days around my dips. "The name is Bond....James Bond."

How can I slip away from this, how can I make an excuse to get out, where are the kids now, ooohhh, they're going over to the neighbors at 4 PM, yes, oh, the boss needs something from town. I can volunteer...etc.

So when I quit, after I made it through the dependency phase, I started feeling like I wasn't doing anything. So much of my day was occupied around planning and strategizing my habit, that I felt my life was empty. I don't know if this will feel the same for everyone, but be prepared. Many members get these funks. I'm at 174 days now, and I don't crave, and I have very little if any funks. They get further and further apart, and shorter and shorter in time span.

 

Isn't it amazing how much you planned around dipping & thought about it without ever realizing you were doing it? I was a ninja dipper too & I know exactly what you're talking about. If I ever feel like I'm not doing anything or get a little down about now having one, I try to think about the freedom I've gained from quitting. That is nice & well worth a little temporary uneasiness.

Many of us "ninja dippers" (those who hid their addiction from family, friends, or loved ones) can relate. I just wonder how much stress I put on my heart each time I would buy my poison in the store and have to look around to make sure no one that knew me and my wife (now "ex") would see me and tell her what I was buying. Or how I would worry that she might stop by my office unannounced while I had a dip in and catch me in my lie. I even remember running at night with a dip in (best way to get my last dose of the drug before bedtime) one time and a client called with an emergency. My wife drove and found me running to tell me about it and told me to get in the car and she'd drive me home. Of course, I insisted on running the rest of the way home, because I didn't want her to notice that I had a dip in. What a fool I was back then. This addiction makes people do stupid things. But not anymore....566 days without tobacco, and now I don't stress out when I'm in line at the store, my office door is open to all, and I can enjoy my running without looking over my shoulder!

I was talking with some people this week that are working toward a quit date for cigarettes. They are using two weeks to deal with triggers - spending time doing certain things they usually do smoking. It really sank in that I used to dip during almost everything I did from waking until bedtime except eating or sitting in the dentist's chair. When most of us quit, our whole life was a trigger.

 

-Euty, Day 597 nicotine-free

 

 

good words, all of them, above. The one that hit me the most, though, was the last sentence:

 

When most of us quit, our whole life was a trigger.

 

To me that is a double-edged sword. On one hand, that makes quitting tobacco so difficult. But on the other, that is why this place is so valuable. The people and their words of wisdom and support can give you the strength to win this battle, if you are ready to embrace the suck and live free. Come join us, and break free from your addiction!

 

I am nearing 4 years quit, and I would not be here without this site or without the men and women in it. Use this site, use these fine folks here, and grab ahold of every life preserver they throw out to you. Join us, and see what life is like post-tobacco! I know you can do it! B)

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speaking of Ninja - My old ford exploder had a flat, I went into the back and opened the chamber where the tire iron/jack is. There was a tin of cope from March 2004 wrapped in a paper towel. That had to be the absolute best spot. We'd travel every weekend to the in-laws or the beach, soccer, baseball, etc... There was almost never a time that I couldn't get something from the car.

"did you remember the wine?"

"Oh crap, it's in the car, be right back"

 

"I think we should get the kids pajamas"

"in the car, I'll get 'em"

 

"Dad, I can't find my nintendo game"

"I think I saw it in the car..."

 

you get the idea. I never looked inside the tin, just stuffed it in the garbage and moved on...

 

If you've ever won at anything in your life, that's the feeling man. All day, all the time, knowing you're the winner. That's what you get when you quit

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Week 3, oh I remember the days. Ya know even though you have passed the addiction phase, some of those weeks before 100 days can have their moments. I experienced significant "funks" between 20 and 30 and around50-70 days. I'm convinced that the early ones were related to the extreme training program that I had put myself through for the previous 21 years. I was a master ninja dipper. Think about. I would spend all of my waking hours planning my days around my dips. "The name is Bond....James Bond."

How can I slip away from this, how can I make an excuse to get out, where are the kids now, ooohhh, they're going over to the neighbors at 4 PM, yes, oh, the boss needs something from town. I can volunteer...etc.

So when I quit, after I made it through the dependency phase, I started feeling like I wasn't doing anything. So much of my day was occupied around planning and strategizing my habit, that I felt my life was empty. I don't know if this will feel the same for everyone, but be prepared. Many members get these funks. I'm at 174 days now, and I don't crave, and I have very little if any funks. They get further and further apart, and shorter and shorter in time span.

 

Isn't it amazing how much you planned around dipping & thought about it without ever realizing you were doing it? I was a ninja dipper too & I know exactly what you're talking about. If I ever feel like I'm not doing anything or get a little down about now having one, I try to think about the freedom I've gained from quitting. That is nice & well worth a little temporary uneasiness.

Many of us "ninja dippers" (those who hid their addiction from family, friends, or loved ones) can relate. I just wonder how much stress I put on my heart each time I would buy my poison in the store and have to look around to make sure no one that knew me and my wife (now "ex") would see me and tell her what I was buying. Or how I would worry that she might stop by my office unannounced while I had a dip in and catch me in my lie. I even remember running at night with a dip in (best way to get my last dose of the drug before bedtime) one time and a client called with an emergency. My wife drove and found me running to tell me about it and told me to get in the car and she'd drive me home. Of course, I insisted on running the rest of the way home, because I didn't want her to notice that I had a dip in. What a fool I was back then. This addiction makes people do stupid things. But not anymore....566 days without tobacco, and now I don't stress out when I'm in line at the store, my office door is open to all, and I can enjoy my running without looking over my shoulder!

I was talking with some people this week that are working toward a quit date for cigarettes. They are using two weeks to deal with triggers - spending time doing certain things they usually do smoking. It really sank in that I used to dip during almost everything I did from waking until bedtime except eating or sitting in the dentist's chair. When most of us quit, our whole life was a trigger.

 

-Euty, Day 597 nicotine-free

 

 

good words, all of them, above. The one that hit me the most, though, was the last sentence:

 

When most of us quit, our whole life was a trigger.

 

To me that is a double-edged sword. On one hand, that makes quitting tobacco so difficult. But on the other, that is why this place is so valuable. The people and their words of wisdom and support can give you the strength to win this battle, if you are ready to embrace the suck and live free. Come join us, and break free from your addiction!

 

I am nearing 4 years quit, and I would not be here without this site or without the men and women in it. Use this site, use these fine folks here, and grab ahold of every life preserver they throw out to you. Join us, and see what life is like post-tobacco! I know you can do it! B)

 

Yes indeed. I relate the those words of wisdom as well. I am just over 60 days into my quit and have found, as a seasoned and skilled ninja dipper, that MY WHOLE LIFE IS A TRIGGER. On the one hand it spreads the difficulty out over all my waking hours, rather than concentrating it into specific hours or activities. On the other hand, it offers little chance of respite.

 

I agree with those above that I suddenly feel both freedom from the need to deceive, and also a loss from not needing to think about it anymore. Sounds strange to say, but strategizing ninja dipping is a challenge. I did not realize how much internal pride I felt about it until the challenge was gone.

 

I am more than glad to say goodbye to that challenge and take on some others...how do you get the smell of cigar smoke out of your clothes anyway...kidding.

 

Thanks for all the wisdom and the power you all have to listen.

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Week 3, oh I remember the days. Ya know even though you have passed the addiction phase, some of those weeks before 100 days can have their moments. I experienced significant "funks" between 20 and 30 and around50-70 days. I'm convinced that the early ones were related to the extreme training program that I had put myself through for the previous 21 years. I was a master ninja dipper. Think about. I would spend all of my waking hours planning my days around my dips. "The name is Bond....James Bond."

How can I slip away from this, how can I make an excuse to get out, where are the kids now, ooohhh, they're going over to the neighbors at 4 PM, yes, oh, the boss needs something from town. I can volunteer...etc.

So when I quit, after I made it through the dependency phase, I started feeling like I wasn't doing anything. So much of my day was occupied around planning and strategizing my habit, that I felt my life was empty. I don't know if this will feel the same for everyone, but be prepared. Many members get these funks. I'm at 174 days now, and I don't crave, and I have very little if any funks. They get further and further apart, and shorter and shorter in time span.

 

Isn't it amazing how much you planned around dipping & thought about it without ever realizing you were doing it? I was a ninja dipper too & I know exactly what you're talking about. If I ever feel like I'm not doing anything or get a little down about now having one, I try to think about the freedom I've gained from quitting. That is nice & well worth a little temporary uneasiness.

Many of us "ninja dippers" (those who hid their addiction from family, friends, or loved ones) can relate. I just wonder how much stress I put on my heart each time I would buy my poison in the store and have to look around to make sure no one that knew me and my wife (now "ex") would see me and tell her what I was buying. Or how I would worry that she might stop by my office unannounced while I had a dip in and catch me in my lie. I even remember running at night with a dip in (best way to get my last dose of the drug before bedtime) one time and a client called with an emergency. My wife drove and found me running to tell me about it and told me to get in the car and she'd drive me home. Of course, I insisted on running the rest of the way home, because I didn't want her to notice that I had a dip in. What a fool I was back then. This addiction makes people do stupid things. But not anymore....566 days without tobacco, and now I don't stress out when I'm in line at the store, my office door is open to all, and I can enjoy my running without looking over my shoulder!

I was talking with some people this week that are working toward a quit date for cigarettes. They are using two weeks to deal with triggers - spending time doing certain things they usually do smoking. It really sank in that I used to dip during almost everything I did from waking until bedtime except eating or sitting in the dentist's chair. When most of us quit, our whole life was a trigger.

 

-Euty, Day 597 nicotine-free

 

 

good words, all of them, above. The one that hit me the most, though, was the last sentence:

 

When most of us quit, our whole life was a trigger.

 

To me that is a double-edged sword. On one hand, that makes quitting tobacco so difficult. But on the other, that is why this place is so valuable. The people and their words of wisdom and support can give you the strength to win this battle, if you are ready to embrace the suck and live free. Come join us, and break free from your addiction!

 

I am nearing 4 years quit, and I would not be here without this site or without the men and women in it. Use this site, use these fine folks here, and grab ahold of every life preserver they throw out to you. Join us, and see what life is like post-tobacco! I know you can do it! B)

 

Yes indeed. I relate the those words of wisdom as well. I am just over 60 days into my quit and have found, as a seasoned and skilled ninja dipper, that MY WHOLE LIFE IS A TRIGGER. On the one hand it spreads the difficulty out over all my waking hours, rather than concentrating it into specific hours or activities. On the other hand, it offers little chance of respite.

 

I agree with those above that I suddenly feel both freedom from the need to deceive, and also a loss from not needing to think about it anymore. Sounds strange to say, but strategizing ninja dipping is a challenge. I did not realize how much internal pride I felt about it until the challenge was gone.

 

I am more than glad to say goodbye to that challenge and take on some others...how do you get the smell of cigar smoke out of your clothes anyway...kidding.

 

Thanks for all the wisdom and the power you all have to listen.

 

Let's not kid ourselves. We ninja dippers ninja.gifwere never as clever as we thought and we got caught in the act quite often. It's nice not to have to lie or apologize for that. When we did get caught, we inevitably lied about how often and how much we were really chewing.....Bill

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Week 3, oh I remember the days. Ya know even though you have passed the addiction phase, some of those weeks before 100 days can have their moments. I experienced significant "funks" between 20 and 30 and around50-70 days. I'm convinced that the early ones were related to the extreme training program that I had put myself through for the previous 21 years. I was a master ninja dipper. Think about. I would spend all of my waking hours planning my days around my dips. "The name is Bond....James Bond."

How can I slip away from this, how can I make an excuse to get out, where are the kids now, ooohhh, they're going over to the neighbors at 4 PM, yes, oh, the boss needs something from town. I can volunteer...etc.

So when I quit, after I made it through the dependency phase, I started feeling like I wasn't doing anything. So much of my day was occupied around planning and strategizing my habit, that I felt my life was empty. I don't know if this will feel the same for everyone, but be prepared. Many members get these funks. I'm at 174 days now, and I don't crave, and I have very little if any funks. They get further and further apart, and shorter and shorter in time span.

 

Isn't it amazing how much you planned around dipping & thought about it without ever realizing you were doing it? I was a ninja dipper too & I know exactly what you're talking about. If I ever feel like I'm not doing anything or get a little down about now having one, I try to think about the freedom I've gained from quitting. That is nice & well worth a little temporary uneasiness.

Many of us "ninja dippers" (those who hid their addiction from family, friends, or loved ones) can relate. I just wonder how much stress I put on my heart each time I would buy my poison in the store and have to look around to make sure no one that knew me and my wife (now "ex") would see me and tell her what I was buying. Or how I would worry that she might stop by my office unannounced while I had a dip in and catch me in my lie. I even remember running at night with a dip in (best way to get my last dose of the drug before bedtime) one time and a client called with an emergency. My wife drove and found me running to tell me about it and told me to get in the car and she'd drive me home. Of course, I insisted on running the rest of the way home, because I didn't want her to notice that I had a dip in. What a fool I was back then. This addiction makes people do stupid things. But not anymore....566 days without tobacco, and now I don't stress out when I'm in line at the store, my office door is open to all, and I can enjoy my running without looking over my shoulder!

I was talking with some people this week that are working toward a quit date for cigarettes. They are using two weeks to deal with triggers - spending time doing certain things they usually do smoking. It really sank in that I used to dip during almost everything I did from waking until bedtime except eating or sitting in the dentist's chair. When most of us quit, our whole life was a trigger.

 

-Euty, Day 597 nicotine-free

 

 

good words, all of them, above. The one that hit me the most, though, was the last sentence:

 

When most of us quit, our whole life was a trigger.

 

To me that is a double-edged sword. On one hand, that makes quitting tobacco so difficult. But on the other, that is why this place is so valuable. The people and their words of wisdom and support can give you the strength to win this battle, if you are ready to embrace the suck and live free. Come join us, and break free from your addiction!

 

I am nearing 4 years quit, and I would not be here without this site or without the men and women in it. Use this site, use these fine folks here, and grab ahold of every life preserver they throw out to you. Join us, and see what life is like post-tobacco! I know you can do it! B)

 

Yes indeed. I relate the those words of wisdom as well. I am just over 60 days into my quit and have found, as a seasoned and skilled ninja dipper, that MY WHOLE LIFE IS A TRIGGER. On the one hand it spreads the difficulty out over all my waking hours, rather than concentrating it into specific hours or activities. On the other hand, it offers little chance of respite.

 

I agree with those above that I suddenly feel both freedom from the need to deceive, and also a loss from not needing to think about it anymore. Sounds strange to say, but strategizing ninja dipping is a challenge. I did not realize how much internal pride I felt about it until the challenge was gone.

 

I am more than glad to say goodbye to that challenge and take on some others...how do you get the smell of cigar smoke out of your clothes anyway...kidding.

 

Thanks for all the wisdom and the power you all have to listen.

 

Let's not kid ourselves. We ninja dippers ninja.gifwere never as clever as we thought and we got caught in the act quite often. It's nice not to have to lie or apologize for that. When we did get caught, we inevitably lied about how often and how much we were really chewing.....Bill

 

 

I sure did lie. "You chew?" "Yeah, sometimes." Sometime...if they only knew. Now?...I don't do that anymore.

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I see you out there.

 

I see you logged in as a guest, wondering if this is the place for you.

 

Wondering if you're really ready to quit.

 

Wondering if it's too late.

 

Wondering why these folks seem to have control of "it".

 

Wondering if you'd fit in with this haphazard bunch of idiots who somehow take on the collective identity of a succesful quitter.

 

The identity of freedom.

 

That thing you long for every time the guilt spikes as you twist the lid off that can.

 

All I can say to you is "yes".

 

Yes, you can quit.

 

Yes, we are here to help you.

 

Yes, your effort will be rewarded 10 fold.

 

It just takes a yes on your part. One simple "yes, I decide to quit and will not dip today".

 

Tomorrow may be scary, but we'll be here to help you.

 

So the question is.. you ready to say "yes"? "Yes, I choose to live free from this drug that has wrappted every single day of my memorable past in misery"?

 

You can do this, and we are here to help. Come on, just say it,

 

yes.....

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